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How has Covid-19 changed you?


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#1 Araucaria

Posted 05 April 2020 - 06:22 PM

What will you do differently now, and after all of this is over?  What will change for you?

#2 fascinated

Posted 05 April 2020 - 06:34 PM

Spend less on future housing, minimise debt.

#3 Fennel Salad

Posted 05 April 2020 - 06:51 PM

Hard to say coz we've only just started. This confinement and economic fall out will be for the long haul.

Being thankful for the little things. Not to be confused with the trite vapid crap mindfulness/gratitude/garbage on SM, as it very rarely came from true adversity ...the person saying almost always enjoys significant privilege.

Most of us will suffer and quite a bit too.

#4 Amica

Posted 05 April 2020 - 06:59 PM

Not panic buying has set my family at a disadvantage. I won't make the same mistake twice.

In 2015 a massive cyclone ripped through. I got caught with an empty tank of  fuel and couldn't get any for weeks as our town was completely cut off. I use to let my tank run low so I got the most out of the 4c supermarket vouchers. 5 years later, when my tank goes below the half line, I panic.

I am so scared of setting myself up to fail a third time.

Edited by Amica, 05 April 2020 - 07:11 PM.


#5 alchetta

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:03 PM

Never take international travel for granted again. Living on the other side of the world from parents and siblings is really hard but there was always the comfort of knowing you could be there within a day or two if you really had to. That luxury has been taken away and I just pray we'll still be able to go see our octogenarian parents when this is over.

On the flipside to that luxury is more of a general wondering about what stricter measures could be accelerated to help the environment. I'm very conscious of the universe's power to incapacitate humanity and I think we are seeing a glimpse of that here. I hope there will be as amazing a rally to protect the environment (which includes us) as there has been to protect our immediate health.

#6 Elsegundo

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:06 PM

So much more mindful of planning for less waste - what we eat and when, what can I  re-use, how to make kids eat all meal and not waste. It is a really good change.

Having hard time with my partner though. He won't work from home though he could so I am working from home 3 days a week plus have 2 primary school aged kids here. Not cool.  Not sure what to do about it but looks like he doesn't feel any responsibility towards sharing that load - it's considered my work. Will see  how it plays out.

#7 -Emissary-

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:09 PM

Nothing. My life will go back to how it was before when this is all over.

#8 José

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:09 PM

i will consider my employment and employer carefully.!
not that employers are to blame for whats going on, but do i want to become a sole trader? am i better of working for a government department? that kind of thing.


#9 ~Jolly_F~

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:16 PM

View Post-Emissary-, on 05 April 2020 - 07:09 PM, said:

Nothing. My life will go back to how it was before when this is all over.

I wish I had some kind of huge reality check that has change d me significantly (there is still time I guess) but I really think once this is done, life will probably go back to the same as it was before.

#10 Mmmcheese

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:25 PM

It's reinforced some of my decisions. We're risk averse in general, so our mortgage is on the lower end. We were in the process of renovating and we were going lower budget despite knowing we 'could' spend more. We're in 'essential' work which I think would be ok in a number of scenarios. I won't put off seeing my parents again though. We ran out of time in January and I'm really sad about that now.

#11 Owls

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:28 PM

I really hope this encourages work from home more now that companies have been forced to see that it can work.

I've been working at home one day a week as that is all I think I can be seen to be away from the office, which is very much an 'all in here together' culture despite everything we do being computer based and available in the cloud.

No reason to be driving across town and wasting resources every day of the week other than for people wanting company. Hopefully this will show that only a couple of days a week are really 'needed' for cultural aspects and we can have a better balance to work life than bums on seats in a crowded open plan office.

Many companies, including my own, have been dragged kicking and screaming into this century and have been now successfully using web based meeting apps for several weeks. It's different, and it's taken some people a while to get their heads around. It's a pity it took this level of disturbance to force it to happen.

#12 Dianalynch

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:29 PM

I started a b.nursing in 2016, returned to my old field though as could more easily fit it in with the kids particularly ds with additional needs and dh was off pursuing new work opportunities so someone had to be around most of the time.

I wish I hadn’t given up on it so easily, I really enjoyed it and felt like it was what I am supposed to be doing.

id just like us to still be alive and well next year, and I’d like to return to my b.nursing studies.

#13 Apageintime

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:29 PM

It has only cemented some of my choices (ie employer, going all in on a big mortgage to get our dream house, not having debt besides mortgage, traveling whenever we can).

When this is all over I think there will be an upswing in dinner dates but that's it.

#14 annodam

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:38 PM

I think travel is the biggest one for me.
I will not travel internationally.
I refuse to prop up another country's tourism when I can spend my money here.
I don't care if I only get a weeks holiday in AU as opposed to 3wks in cheap & nasty Bali or some other destination.
It's made me realise that all our cases of CV are from overseas travellers doing the wrong thing.
We're an island FFS, we don't need that sh*t here!
So, by holidaying here, keeps my money here, keeps the economy ticking over & keeps people in jobs.



EFS:

Edited by annodam, 05 April 2020 - 07:40 PM.


#15 JRA

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:43 PM

Interesting question.

It is interesting timing for us, DS is meant to finish y12 this year and we had lots of plans for next year.

Our financial position is a bit different to what it was 3 mths ago with the stock market spiral.

Our plans were to travel a bit, we were hoping to do overseas first, that may change to the other way around and do more in Aus.

#16 born.a.girl

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:45 PM

View PostElsegundo, on 05 April 2020 - 07:06 PM, said:

So much more mindful of planning for less waste - what we eat and when, what can I  re-use, how to make kids eat all meal and not waste. It is a really good change.

Having hard time with my partner though. He won't work from home though he could so I am working from home 3 days a week plus have 2 primary school aged kids here. Not cool.  Not sure what to do about it but looks like he doesn't feel any responsibility towards sharing that load - it's considered my work. Will see  how it plays out.

Great news about the leftovers.

Given I was brought up in a different era, being 67, I'm often horrified by the level of waste I see as being acceptable.

I'm sorry about your partner though. So much for being partners in life, eh.

Is it possible to try to do your work once he's home? Obviously that depends on whether you have a separate area to work in.  Too many people, most of them male, think that women can raise kids with one hand and do other stuff, with the other.  They, in the meantime, require absolute clear air while they work. Makes me wonder how they keep their jobs, sometimes, given most people have to work with a reasonable level of interaction, and interruptions.

I hope it improves for you.

#17 Black Velvet

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:47 PM

Live more in the moment. I'm a massive planner and that's gone to crap now.

#18 -Emissary-

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:49 PM

View PostOwls, on 05 April 2020 - 07:28 PM, said:

I really hope this encourages work from home more now that companies have been forced to see that it can work.

I've been working at home one day a week as that is all I think I can be seen to be away from the office, which is very much an 'all in here together' culture despite everything we do being computer based and available in the cloud.

No reason to be driving across town and wasting resources every day of the week other than for people wanting company. Hopefully this will show that only a couple of days a week are really 'needed' for cultural aspects and we can have a better balance to work life than bums on seats in a crowded open plan office.

Many companies, including my own, have been dragged kicking and screaming into this century and have been now successfully using web based meeting apps for several weeks. It's different, and it's taken some people a while to get their heads around. It's a pity it took this level of disturbance to force it to happen.

I think it’ll do the opposite.

So far, the people I know who have been working at home have been dealing with network issues, internet connection, and back pain as they haven’t been set up properly. Many of my colleagues actually had to drive into work as working from home wasn’t working. We’re an essential service so we’re still open and work still has to be done.

There’s no doubt also been a drastic dip in productivity as people juggle doing their jobs and their kids, who have been kept at home. DH has found that he has to constantly check in with his bosses and have more meetings now then he did before.

I’m all for working from home, I used to do it once a week while pregnant and my company fully supports it so it’s a shame to see that people are actually struggling with it and I have no doubt this will solidify some arguments against it for companies who wants to remain in the dark age.

#19 zande

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:52 PM

It’s made me realise how much I depend on work. I’m a single mum with no single friends and I don’t date, work is my only source of self esteem, socialising and contact. After all this is over I think it’s time to either ramp up my career (currently working below my potential for my girls’ sake) or maybe I’ll bite the bullet and join a meet-up group, or both - not to find a partner, but some single friends.  I think this has shown me that I don’t want or need a partner, as it’s only work that I’ve been missing the most.  My goal has been to seek a government role which I think makes even more sense now, I have miraculously stayed employed for the time being but I’d like to sure things up before I hit my 50s.

Edited by zande, 05 April 2020 - 07:52 PM.


#20 kimasa

Posted 05 April 2020 - 07:55 PM

I'm not sure.

I'm seeing people struggling everywhere. People are reaching out to me because their social outlets are gone. I liked my work's Facebook status and one of my baby rhyme time regulars recognised my picture and messaged me because she's not coping and turns out I'm the only person who she feels has given her the time of day since having a baby. I had one of DD's friend's mums crying over the phone to me because her ex won't take the kids for his weekends because he doesn't want to get sick (the kids are not sick) and she's exhausted. I keep seeing English-speaking people go on and on about online schooling, not realising how damn lucky and privileged they are to own a computer for their kids to school from/have the ability to understand the wok their kids are doing and they're acting like it's no big deal and that everyone can do it and everyone can't and no one seems to care about those who can't. It's like, eh **** those kids, who cares about those kids?

I feel like social issues are getting bigger and bigger and bigger and what little things we had in place to somewhat prop people up are gone.

There has to be something to fix this. Once it's over I have to do more, I'm so privileged and I have a responsibility to use the fact that I can be heard and whilst I do that somewhat, it's not enough, I can do a lot more.

#21 No Drama Please

Posted 05 April 2020 - 08:02 PM

All our family lives overseas and normally just one of us will go visit as it’s too hard to coordinate everything with both of us working and kids and school and everything. As soon as this is over we will all be going as a family to visit for at least a month. Not having the option to know we can go and see them if we really needed to is really scary.

#22 petal71

Posted 05 April 2020 - 08:04 PM

I think (hope) I will never take for granted again everyday things like popping into a café, dinners with friends, gym, swimming pool etc.

I also now know how quickly things fall apart in the economy. I am lucky - most of my working life (not that I worked conventionally that much of it - did way too much study, had mat leave, and years of self-employment that was never financially viable) - was in the growth years. I remember recessions but they didn't affect me personally that much as I was a student or at school.

I count myself so lucky that I moved to full time employment, and in a *relatively* stable industry, a couple of years ago. This crisis has made me aware of how quickly job security can evaporate.

#23 Sleep Debt

Posted 05 April 2020 - 08:14 PM

I've always wanted to be less reliant on the big supermarkets, and this has just given me that extra push to do it. We have a veggie patch but now I'm ensuring I make it as productive as possible. I'm sourcing our meat and fruit from local businesses. Like someone else has said, I'm more aware of food waste and try to limit it where I can.

I have more of an appreciation in just how much planning must go on behind the scenes for teachers.

My focus is less on work and more on family. I am a little more forgiving with the kids and have a bit more patience. I don't know how work is going to pan out post this. I'm pretty sure I'll be out of a job in a couple of weeks, and I'll find it  difficult to find one post this as competition will be intense. It depresses the hell out of me so I'm trying to not think about it and put a positive "yay, more time with the family" spin on it.

I'm more aware of just how much I have to be thankful for.

#24 eliza_non

Posted 05 April 2020 - 08:23 PM

We wont be upgrading/moving to a bigger house. This has taught me that I would much prefer to be in a situation with a small mortgage and have other investments/savings to fall back on.

I will look to move into the public service in the next 5 years. I’ve found the private sector to be very volatile during both Covid19 and the GFC.

Will do less extra curricular activities. It has been slightly relieving not to run the kids (and us adults) to so many events.

Will run a leaner budget going forward to invest more for a rainy day. Eg. I ditched our extras cover when I lost my job last fortnight, and won’t be rejoining once things return to normal!

#25 #YKG

Posted 05 April 2020 - 08:24 PM

Don’t know yet, I’ll let you know when it’s over and not exhausted and not working 6 day weeks.

Edited by #YKG, 05 April 2020 - 08:24 PM.





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