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Our mishap in Kmart Tuggeranong today


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#26 not-surprised

Posted 21 November 2007 - 09:02 AM

I very rarely take my DD anywhere wearing clothes that cost anything like that much.

I expect I would be mega-peeved if she did something like that wearing her new sandals but I doubt I would expect the shop to replace them. Perhaps if my Mum was "supervising" when it happened I would ask (not demand) *her* to replace the sandals?

I too am oomg.gif at the hardware store comment!!! Perhaps garden centres shouldn't be able to have plants in case a child eats some dirt while the parents aren't watching? wacko.gif

Steph

Edited by s_m, 21 November 2007 - 09:02 AM.


#27 CheynKissy

Posted 21 November 2007 - 09:30 AM

QUOTE
and he looks at us like he's an idiot.


Are you sure he was looking at you like HE was an idiot? unsure.gif  I think he may have been appalled at your nerve at asking for a voucher to replace your daughters clothes. I would have been mortified if this had happened. You are lucky they didn't make you pay for the paint. How did your daughter get the paint open if she was holding your mums hand? She must have 10 fingers on one hand and double jointed fingers blink.gif

#28 karenmc

Posted 21 November 2007 - 09:30 AM

QUOTE
Honest question, would people be saying anything different if she had grabbed the one with no lid?


Honest answer - no, I would still say the same. To be blunt (again ph34r.gif ), I am pretty sure they only gave you the voucher so you would go away, not as any admission that they did something wrong.

#29 knieally

Posted 21 November 2007 - 09:53 AM

Thanks for providing a lively topic Tash. I think it's good you care about your daughter and worried about her.

I'm sure you probably told your daughter not to touch the paints as a discipline straight after you discovered her paints.

When I was 5, I painted my entire uncle's car with black tyre paint. It wouldn't come off wacko.gif I'm pretty creative and do oil painting now. Maybe your daughter has some hidden creative talents?

#30 regandrog

Posted 21 November 2007 - 11:15 AM

I think this probably a shared responsibility situation.
Parents have responsibility to ensure their child is not getting into things they shouldn't touch in public places and the shops have a responsibility to ensure they are not putting their customers at risk in displaying their goods.

Basically I don't think it was the shop's fault your daughter got paint on her.  Reasonably they would expect people not to open products until purchased.

I think it was a little extreme to ask for the voucher, she got it on her clothes because she opened the paint, and used it inappropriately.
Would you expect the shop to replace an adults clothes if they had done the same?

If it was a faulty product and the paint leaked out unexpectedly then I think there is some justification for asking for some compensation for damage to clothes.

A lively discussion!

Edited by regandrog, 21 November 2007 - 11:16 AM.


#31 Michelle&Girls

Posted 21 November 2007 - 11:43 AM

DuckDuckGoose:

QUOTE
QUOTEYouve never taken your children to the hardware shop?
Yes I take them to hardware shops. However I don't let my children play with axes. Strangely enough they are supervised at all times.


Yes my kids were supervised, and they didnt go near the axes, and YES i do supervise them when im shopping.
I was more concerned in case someone else hurt themselves on the uncovered axes...The axes should be covered, its an OH&S issue for staff, adult shopper and children.

#32 sweetkittykira

Posted 21 November 2007 - 12:13 PM

ok just wanted to put this out there re: the non-child friendly items on low shelves....

When I was pregnant with DD2, DD1 was going thru her running away stage. We were trying to train her NOT to be in the pram as I refused to buy a twin pram for a child who was almost 3.

More than once I was waddling around K mart chasing DD1 while she ran around thinking it was the best game on earth. Now I'm sure that I'll be brunt at the steak for this post, but at these times, I was doing my best to supervise my DD, however she wasn't exactly co-operating!

What if she did get into something dangerous on a low shelf? I was 8 months pregnant I couldn't exactly sprint!!

Just something to consider  ph34r.gif

#33 Kafkaesque

Posted 21 November 2007 - 12:26 PM

QUOTE
What if she did get into something dangerous on a low shelf? I was 8 months pregnant I couldn't exactly sprint!!

Just something to consider ph34r.gif


Sorry but if you couldn't get her then you should have had a harness/lead or had her in a trolley. What do people expect shops to do have everything higher than a toddler wacko.gif

OP you where wrong in demanding they give you a $30 voucher.  It was your child and you or your mother should have been watching properly.  If it was me I would have been horribly embarrassed that I had been so lacking in my supervision and would have slunk out of the store hopping they didn't notice my child had destroyed some of their stock.

#34 canberragirl

Posted 21 November 2007 - 12:30 PM

QUOTE
What if she did get into something dangerous on a low shelf? I was 8 months pregnant I couldn't exactly sprint!!
If you knew she was a 'runner' at that time you should not have had her in the shop unrestrained.

#35 sweetkittykira

Posted 21 November 2007 - 12:35 PM

Your so right!!!

I should have isolated myself and my child and then she would have never learnt any better rolleyes.gif

#36 canberragirl

Posted 21 November 2007 - 12:37 PM

original.gif I'm sure that's not what the other poster and I meant. Those little straps and wristbands were designed exactly for the age and stage (the runner!) that your DD was at. You can let go of the child but they can't stray more than a metre from you.

But what would I know hey? I've only got a 4yo.  rolleyes.gif

Clearly you should not sit at home all day!  ohmy.gif

#37 sweetkittykira

Posted 21 November 2007 - 12:48 PM

OK I'm not saying I just let her run wild.
We had a trolley (which he HATED) and she had to earn her walking privileges. When I caught her she was put back in the trolley until she calmed down and we tried again.

It also happened all of 3 times. Not really enough to justify a lead. DD1 is now very good when we are out. And walks calmly by the pram. Something which I thank my tactics for!

I'm also not saying that NOTHING should be on lower shelves.

What I AM saying is that stores should maybe use a little common sense about what they do put on lower shelves. For example, paints that look like lip gloss with no plastic wrap on them.

#38 mint*condition

Posted 21 November 2007 - 12:56 PM

QUOTE
What if she did get into something dangerous on a low shelf? I was 8 months pregnant I couldn't exactly sprint!!


So lucky nothing happened? How irresponsible. There are a few ways you could prevent a kid running in a shop.

OP - My son tripped over a low cooktop that was left in the middle of a store on the floor! He didn't see it. He had a surgery to fix a torn nerve and muscles in his hand as a result. My son was right next to us when he tripped. Cook top obviously wasn't meant to be there on the floor but the display wasn't properly set.

Apparently you can only sue a shop if there is permanent damage done to a person as a result of an injury happened within the shop premises. The law was changed to protect shops from people like you suing for silly little things. In this case I don't even think its the shop's fault. It is yours for not looking after your daughter, you are lucky she escaped with just coloured shirt.

#39 sweetkittykira

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:03 PM

Irresponsible would have been not chasing her at all!!!  glare.gif

#40 Guest_TashaLJ_*

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:06 PM

Another question.
Would your answers change if Jemma had been in the pram?

We all know in stores you can't park a pram in the middle of the aisle, because eventually someone is going to want to get passed, and you will need to move the pram near the shelf. My stroller is short enough that Jemma would have been strapped in and still have been able to reach the paints.

Would that make a difference to your answers?

I know we have go OT a bit, but a harness would not have prevented this accident.

Sweetkittykira, I agree with you. Sometimes we have to put up with the running away a few times, to teach our children to stay close to the pram. People telling you that your child should have been a trolley, really aren't thinking about the fact that eventually you will still have to teach your child not to run off. Better to do it when they are young, than have a 5 year old doing it, and people saying that your child should know better! When really are we supposed to teach them?

I used a harness on Jemma, and then graduated to holding her hand and she learnt quickly not to run off. The looks I got though because I was harnessing my child and she wasn't a "dog" as people put it was annoying, but I got over it. But as mothers we can't win. Someone is going to complain about something.

Edited by TashaLJ, 21 November 2007 - 01:12 PM.


#41 sweetkittykira

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:13 PM

Thanks Tash.... That was just what I was trying to say laughing2.gif

And even though I think you have guts asking for the voucher.... those paints should have been up higher... in fact, are they even allowed to sell paints that aren't wrapped up properly??

#42 canberragirl

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:13 PM

I see no difference to a child being in a stroller pulling things off shelves to a child walking about doing the same thing. We all *know* our toddlers at some stage reach out to grab items from shelves. I can only speak for myself but when DS was at that stage I made sure I watched him EVERY SECOND (yes I did) and if he grabbed at something I whipped it away from him quick smart.

No shop is a place where you can take your eyes of your child for a second. Nor is a public place. I am AMAZED to see parents who get to a park and just let their young children go and play while the parents sit down and chat or read or whatever. Not watching their every move.  ph34r.gif

#43 Guest_TashaLJ_*

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:20 PM

QUOTE
OP - My son tripped over a low cooktop that was left in the middle of a store on the floor! He didn't see it. He had a surgery to fix a torn nerve and muscles in his hand as a result. My son was right next to us when he tripped. Cook top obviously wasn't meant to be there on the floor but the display wasn't properly set.

Oh my, poor thing. Is his hand ok Mint? That really would have been a terrible experience.

QUOTE
The law was changed to protect shops from people like you suing for silly little things.

Bit offended by this bit, how do you know I am one of those people? I am not. Long story short, (you can go back to June 13th last year in my posts for the whole story), but a driver killed my grandmother last year by his irresponsibility, even though we could have sued, we chose not to because the man had suffered enough pain by killing someone. Don't lump me into that category please!

Edited by TashaLJ, 21 November 2007 - 01:23 PM.


#44 Guest_Bec-n-Boys_*

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:21 PM

QUOTE
Sometimes we have to put up with the running away a few times, to teach our children to stay close to the pram


Sorry but i have disagree with this statement!

On Sunday DH and i stopped of at Wagga on the way home from mums for a bit of lunch. We took Blade out of the pram so he could sit at the table with us. I went to coles and left Blade and Jett with DH. When i returned 5 mintues later, DH had said that Blade ran off and he couldn't find him.

Eventually he was found ( he went to the loo) but what if we didn't find him?? How does that teach him to stay close to the pram if he was never found??

My lesson learnt in that was, never to let Blade out of the pram in public again until he is a lot older.

#45 regandrog

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:23 PM

It is irrelevant if a child is sitting or walking.  I would expect parents to prevent their children from acessing and opening products they aren't going to buy.

What if it was a lolly or chocolate and that stained her clothes?  Should the shop pay for a replacement then?

I understand you consider it unreasonable for them to put a potentially dangerous or at least messy item where it could be so easily accessed, but in a shop like Kmart you really can't expect that they would childproof the whole shop.  

These things happen with kids, you just can't stop them from getting into things 100% of the time.

#46 Guest_TashaLJ_*

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:24 PM

Bec, I didn't mean run away and not be able to be seen. I meant TRY to run away, and quickly be grabbed, and told not to.
QUOTE
My lesson learnt in that was, never to let Blade out of the pram in public again until he is a lot older.

That's my point, what is older? 5? I can tell you now, if you wait, and then he is still running off at 5, people are going to tell you you should have taught him earlier.
(Not having a go at you Bec, just a discussion).

Edited by TashaLJ, 21 November 2007 - 01:29 PM.


#47 Guest_toppy_*

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:27 PM

QUOTE
What if she did get into something dangerous on a low shelf? I was 8 months pregnant I couldn't exactly sprint!!


It would still be your fault.  If you can't run, you put her in a trolley, a harness or a pram.  What if she ran into someone who was frail, could they make you pay for any medical attention needed if they were injured?

Remember there is also a problem with putting things up high, people can't reach them.  As people age, many shrink.  Is it fair that they should have to struggle to reach things.

If the paint is not sealed contact the manufacturer of it.  If it's a Kmart product, email them, if not find the manufacturer and complain to them.

What can go on bottom shelves in shops?  Toys - no, chn will play with them and damage them.  Food - no, child may eat it.  Clothes - no, chn may wipe their hands on it.  Cosmetics - no, poisonous.  Gift paper/cards - no chn may pull them apart.  Tools, pet food, cleaning products, electrical goods.  Sorry I can't find anything that is not a loss risk to the store or a mess/safety hazard to unrestrained chn.

#48 mint*condition

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:30 PM

Tasha, he is fine. Thanks for asking.

I put you in that category because you demanded to be compensated for something your kid had done in the shop.

#49 Michelle&Girls

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:35 PM

gosh, we are all human and cant keep our eyes on our kids 24 x 7, and if you are at the shop, you obviously need to buy something and this requires you to take your eyes off them for minutes.

#50 brazen

Posted 21 November 2007 - 01:40 PM

so... because i'm human, the shop is responsible for my children?
yeah, i like it, maybe tomorrow i'll just take them to the shops and leave them there for the people who are responsible for them to look after...




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