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Global Development Delay. Where to from here?


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#1 Rockstar

Posted 16 March 2009 - 09:14 AM

My youngest child 2.5 yrs has today officially been diagnosed with Global Development delay. She has problems in speech,processing,fine and gross motor skills.
She is on the wait list for early intervention for speech and OT.
Is this permanent? Or will the intervention help and she will "grow out of it"?
I already have a child with High Functioning Autism and another with Down Syndrome. So you'd think I'd be used to it all by now. But it stings when you find out another child has something else wrong with them.
I had just been putting her problems down to speech and thought she would just develop in her own time. I hadn't realised she had other delays as well.

Any advice/stories appreciated.

#2 JuliaGulia

Posted 16 March 2009 - 10:13 AM

Hi.

My DD has GDD.  She is significantly delayed in all areas, and was "diagnosed" quite young.  She is 2 years, 9.5 months, and was initially diagnosed at just over 12 months.

I would imagine you are headed down the diagnosis elimination path (if you have not already been down that road).  We have had countless tests down, mostly to rule out various diagnoses.  So far, there is no explanation for her delay.

The expected outcomes would depend, I would think, on whether or not you get an explanation for the delay.  As we have no explanation, noone can really tell us what to expect.  So we just keep going, hoping to get her as far as we can.

We do expect that she will walk, communicate in some fashion, and hopefully be able to self-care as much as possible.  We actually think (and so have most of her therapists) that she is quite clever, but the developmental delays are preventing her from expressing it.  We still hope to find the key that will unlock it all, IYKWIM.

Yes, it stings, a lot.  But I guess you just keep putting one foot in front of the other.  

Anyway, I am happy to chat and answer any questions if I can.

#3 Rockstar

Posted 16 March 2009 - 10:41 AM

Thanks.
My girl does walk and run etc quite fine. I too think she is quite smart. I thought she was fine with her motor skills. Apparently not though.

#4 TeamBlue

Posted 16 March 2009 - 10:48 AM

Hi my DS#1 is 4in april he has this, i too thought speech was his main problem  although  i had questioned some of his behaviour. My DS can not pedal a trike, but is currently learning skills like holding pencils, cutlery etc in EI.In ST he is working on things that describe things like" boy is sitting"or "girl is jumping". He is getting more confident in some areas tthumbs.gif  We are trailing the elimanation path of the cause of the GDD now,although i partly don't want to know sad.gif

#5 Rockstar

Posted 16 March 2009 - 10:58 AM

The specialist hasn't mentioned an Elimination path as yet. They had suggested a hearing test when I was only back then querying her lack of speech. She can hold a pencil (has decorated my walls often  grin.gif  ) She does attempt to use a spoon to feed herself but usually resorts to hands. Her speech is minimal. She says only a couple of words clearly, it is mainly sounds that she makes, and I had got her to put two words together but she does it a couple of times and doesn't do it again.

Now we just wait and once she is in EI things should start rolling.

#6 DreamMum

Posted 18 March 2009 - 10:08 AM

my DD1 has GDD was diagnosed early as well 12 months. Intervention helps for sure - Children with GDD some develop with leap and bounds as they get older but I think they'll always be alittle behind in some areas.

mine is registered with DSC and we get continious support from their therapist - now shes at Kindy and with aide time she seems to be settling in well but I dont think she'd be where she is if she hadn't had all the therapy the last 3 years!

#7 Guest_Cat©_*

Posted 18 March 2009 - 01:30 PM

GDD at such a young age is no indication of the future possibilities. Children that are quite delayed at young ages can make massive leaps ahead and by school age can be in the norm.

I have Joshua who was GDD diagnosed at 15mnths....ended up by age 2 1/2 with an autism diagnosis...intellectually he is above average but his behavioural and self care skill lack seriously.

Kayne was GDD, diagnosed at 3 with PDD_NOS later to be changed to aspergers (not officially as yet)...he is normal in every way (except some communication issues, and is in remedial classes for english/reading etc)

Corbyn was diagnosed as GDD age 10mnths, reassesed at 6 and diagnosed as intellectually impared.

Noah Is GDD diagnosed at 3 but by the looks of it will be fine by around 5ish....some sensory issues, some social issues but thats all (yippee)

So GDD in early age can mean anything from autism, to intellectual imparement to jsut delayed with a great catch up!!
By the things you wrote your daughter isnt too delayed, hopefully with some early intervention she will catch up beautifully!

I do know what you mean when you hear that one more may have some special needs.....Im still waiting and hoping Ethan is ok....

#8 luckybug80

Posted 20 March 2009 - 11:26 PM

Hi
We have a similar situation. DD is almost 3 with a diagnosis of GD(severe)and Autism(low functioning). She also has Epilepsy but thankfully it seems to be under control. Although she's not walking she is able to weight-bear and has no trouble crawling after me (and grizzling)in the hope of yet again being picked up! DD also has no speech and needs us to address all her care needs. We have started role modelling 2 signs(Makaton)in the hope of developing her communication skills. Nice to read positive posts about kids in similar situations.

#9 crazychick

Posted 02 February 2012 - 09:06 AM

QUOTE (igotmyrockmoves @ 16/03/2009, 09:14 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
My youngest child 2.5 yrs has today officially been diagnosed with Global Development delay. She has problems in speech,processing,fine and gross motor skills.
She is on the wait list for early intervention for speech and OT.
Is this permanent? Or will the intervention help and she will "grow out of it"?
I already have a child with High Functioning Autism and another with Down Syndrome. So you'd think I'd be used to it all by now. But it stings when you find out another child has something else wrong with them.
I had just been putting her problems down to speech and thought she would just develop in her own time. I hadn't realised she had other delays as well.

Any advice/stories appreciated.


#10 crazychick

Posted 02 February 2012 - 09:10 AM

QUOTE (julia_traps @ 16/03/2009, 10:13 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi.

My DD has GDD.  She is significantly delayed in all areas, and was "diagnosed" quite young.  She is 2 years, 9.5 months, and was initially diagnosed at just over 12 months.

I would imagine you are headed down the diagnosis elimination path (if you have not already been down that road).  We have had countless tests down, mostly to rule out various diagnoses.  So far, there is no explanation for her delay.

The expected outcomes would depend, I would think, on whether or not you get an explanation for the delay.  As we have no explanation, noone can really tell us what to expect.  So we just keep going, hoping to get her as far as we can.

We do expect that she will walk, communicate in some fashion, and hopefully be able to self-care as much as possible.  We actually think (and so have most of her therapists) that she is quite clever, but the developmental delays are preventing her from expressing it.  We still hope to find the key that will unlock it all, IYKWIM.

Yes, it stings, a lot.  But I guess you just keep putting one foot in front of the other.  

Anyway, I am happy to chat and answer any questions if I can.


#11 crazychick

Posted 02 February 2012 - 09:25 AM

hi,well im amazed that theres a site for us families.My little girl has global developmental delay.Im in the process of looking for a proper understanding doctor to assess her once again.I to have my days as to wonder why my child as i have 4 grown up sons that have skipped through life with just a few scratches.It saddens to at times when my mati tries to communaciate with me and I dont understand her.mati is a little social dancer,has eye problems.I could go on,but I;ll leave it there.Hopefully someone will read this and maybe we will have a lifeline which we both need.cheers kay. unsure.gif

#12 JuliaGulia

Posted 02 February 2012 - 10:57 AM

Hi Kay, and welcome to EB.

I hope that you can find a good paediatrician to help you with Mati (is it short for Matilda?).

Today is a big day for us, as Olivia has started school.  She is at a Special Development School, in a class with 5 other children with various disabilities.  We were a bit sad and a lot nervous, but she was very happy to be there.

We still do not have a formal diagnosis, and it is unlikely that we ever will.  Sometimes it bothers me, but mostly I just focus on Olivia being Olivia.  She is beautiful, and happy, and that is a lot to ask for.

This is a very supportive sub-forum, and there are a lot of wonderful parents in here who will be able to answer any questions you may have.

#13 TiredbutHappy

Posted 02 February 2012 - 11:05 AM

QUOTE (JuliaGulia @ 02/02/2012, 11:57 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We still do not have a formal diagnosis, and it is unlikely that we ever will.  Sometimes it bothers me, but mostly I just focus on Olivia being Olivia.  She is beautiful, and happy, and that is a lot to ask for.

DH said something the other when I lying there sobbing again (I think it must partly be pre-natal depression).  S is not autism.  She is a beautiful little girl, and autism is very very small part of her.  I've now tried stopped thinking about it every time I look at her and am trying to focus on what I love about her and focus on her talents instead.  It's still hard but it has helped a little.

#14 Marina_D

Posted 02 February 2012 - 12:13 PM

Hi All,

My DS was labelled with GDD last week and is also on the spectrum. Ive always wondered whether they improve or not and I have yet to see the development paed to ask the question. Many have raised the 'elimination path' - excuse my ignorance but is this where they do genetic testing etc? I want to know what has caused this delay - and we also want another child but i want to ensure this is not a genetic thing.

who do i go to that will help me test for this? is it the developmental paed?

JuliaGuilia - i like what you have said about Olivia, and Gumbette - I like what your DH has said. Its very useful to focus on who they are and not what their diagnosed with... I tried to do this yesterday and I found a little joy through the tears...

#15 mummy.to.one

Posted 02 February 2012 - 12:58 PM

Hi DS's GP has told us he has global development delay, but will not send us to a paed until 18months. We currently see a physio for his muscle strength and the physio has now recommended we see a speech pathologist.

Its hard as everyone tells me he will catch up, he is just a bit slower but when do you stop listening to that? Gumbette that is true look at her with positives. original.gif

#16 ~chiquita~

Posted 03 February 2012 - 06:14 PM

Hi everyone,

I'm glad Kay picked up this thread as my DS will most likely be diagnosed with GDD. Some days I'm fine and coping well then other days the pain is so bad I can barely stand it. I'd really like to stay in touch with people that are in a similar position to me. No-one else around me seems to get it.

We've just returned from a girlfriend's house and DS kept playing with the telephone. She kept saying no to him and he burst into tears numerous times. I can't believe how upset he was and I don't see the issue with playing with the phone? Our OT had actually been using a phone as an activity yesterday so my poor guy was probably really confused. I should've said something but didn't. She knows what's going on. Her 10 year old was also making fun of the noises he was making. He's going through a real shy stage ATM which isn't helping. I don't think we'll be visiting again. As he gets older it's more obvious there's something not quite right and being out with him, especially at parties, is starting to get really difficult. sad.gif  

QUOTE
JuliaGuilia - i like what you have said about Olivia, and Gumbette - I like what your DH has said. Its very useful to focus on who they are and not what their diagnosed with... I tried to do this yesterday and I found a little joy through the tears...


I'm struggling to do this most days. I look at his gorgeous face and wonder whether he'll ever see the beauty in the world around him. He's not interested in much and the older he gets the less he seems to smile.

Julia, I hope Olivia is settling into school well, and Gumbette, this is hard isn't it, I can handle anything but this. I feel like DS is slipping away from me.

Marina, I don't know much about genetic testing although your development paed should be able to point you in the right direction.

mummy.to.one We've started seeing an OT and a ST. DS is in the normal range for gross motor skills and receptive language but is currently around the 11 month level for cognitive, and 10 month for expressive and fine motor. The OT has helped us a great deal, I've seen some small improvements in DS's play skills and we've only been seeing her for three weeks. I watch how she plays with DS and do the same at home. I spend the majority of my day on the floor playing with him, a lot of the time he just wanders off, but seeing him finally be able to put all the rings on the stacker is a huge victory.  

QUOTE
Its hard as everyone tells me he will catch up, he is just a bit slower but when do you stop listening to that?


Personally, I've stopped listening to this now. DS may catch up, but I have to seriously consider there's a very strong possibility he won't. Sorry ladies, I'm having a real FML kind of day. I promise to be more positive and upbeat next time.

I hope we can keep this thread going.

Edited by ~chiquita~, 03 February 2012 - 06:41 PM.


#17 mummy.to.one

Posted 03 February 2012 - 06:51 PM

Chiquita I understand the getting upset easily over small things, If something doesn't go his way or like you said taking a phone away when they are playing with them DS gets upset which can vary in degree.

It's hard when you have a bad day, sorry you have. I find some days hard especially when we have been to swimming or other activities. Where there are babies half his age which seem older iykwim, or babies joining our swim class then getting all the stickers and moving on to the toddler class, the last sticker is standing/walking so we will be a fair bit off that, they have actually told me that they will probably move us up anyway now, but it's hard.

Sound wise Connor doesn't speak, he makes an 'oohhhh' sound which he always has, when he was little we would repeat it back but as time has gone on now we trying to stop this and say what he is pointing at with the proper word.

Is anyone here in Sydney? I have found a playgroup for children with developmental issues I haven't attended yet so can't comment, but will next week.

#18 Marina_D

Posted 03 February 2012 - 06:54 PM

QUOTE (~chiquita~ @ 03/02/2012, 07:14 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hi everyone,

I'm glad Kay picked up this thread as my DS will most likely be diagnosed with GDD. Some days I'm fine and coping well then other days the pain is so bad I can barely stand it. I'd really like to stay in touch with people that are in a similar position to me. No-one else around me seems to get it.

We've just returned from a girlfriend's house and DS kept playing with the telephone. She kept saying no to him and he burst into tears numerous times. I can't believe how upset he was and I don't see the issue with playing with the phone? Our OT had actually been using a phone as an activity yesterday so my poor guy was probably really confused. I should've said something but didn't. She knows what's going on. Her 10 year old was also making fun of the noises he was making. He's going through a real shy stage ATM which isn't helping. I don't think we'll be visiting again. As he gets older it's more obvious there's something not quite right and being out with him, especially at parties, is starting to get really difficult. sad.gif  



I'm struggling to do this most days. I look at his gorgeous face and wonder whether he'll ever see the beauty in the world around him. He's not interested in much and the older he gets the less he seems to smile.

Julia, I hope Olivia is settling into school well, and Gumbette, this is hard isn't it, I can handle anything but this. I feel like DS is slipping away from me.

Marina, I don't know much about genetic testing although your development paed should be able to point you in the right direction.

mummy.to.one We've started seeing an OT and a ST. DS is in the normal range for gross motor skills and receptive language but is currently around the 11 month level for cognitive, and 10 month for expressive and fine motor. The OT has helped us a great deal, I've seen some small improvements in DS's play skills and we've only been seeing her for three weeks. I watch how she plays with DS and do the same at home. I spend the majority of my day on the floor playing with him, a lot of the time he just wanders off, but seeing him finally be able to put all the rings on the stacker is a huge victory.  

I hope we can keep this thread going.


Big hugs to you, it does hurt a bunch does it...

Let me first say that your DS currently 15months? is only behind about 5 months at worst. Its not that bad and they can quickly catch-up esp with EI. My DS (who had cancer as a baby) was classed as GDD with his gross motor a few months behind but his language/hearing/fine motor skills at about 7 months. This was devastating to me, and this was only a week ago!!

Its fantastic that your doing some therapy at home with him, and as Ive been told by the clinical psychologist who assessed him and also other members here - its important to stay positive. I know your having a crappy day, and we are all here to support you. I only cired once today which is a big achievement! lol

We can definetly keep this thread going and just be an ongoing support for each other. Is your DS also on the spectrum?

Its great you started therapy so fast, the clinical psychologist who assesed my DS said starting now (hes 17.5 months) is too early and wait till 2...

#19 ~chiquita~

Posted 04 February 2012 - 07:08 AM

Thanks for replies and support ladies, it really means a lot.

mummy.to.one: I think what upset him the most was the way she spoke to him. I've never said 'no' in that tone of voice unless he was about to do something really dangerous.

QUOTE
I find some days hard especially when we have been to swimming or other activities. Where there are babies half his age which seem older iykwim, or babies joining our swim class then getting all the stickers and moving on to the toddler class, the last sticker is standing/walking so we will be a fair bit off that, they have actually told me that they will probably move us up anyway now, but it's hard.

I know exactly what you mean, this is when I struggle too. You're much stronger than me, I'm actually starting to steer clear of activities where other babies and toddlers are because it makes me feel really sad. It's also when I realise how far behind DS is. I hope Connor gets some stickers and moves up to the toddler class soon. He's adorable btw and he's 5 weeks older than my DS.

DS says bubba and calls Daddy gagga, but he also makes those 'oohhh' sounds too. It's great that Connor is pointing, DS doesn't point with his index finger but uses his whole hand. He's got a thing about pointing at all the lights in every room atm.  

QUOTE
Is anyone here in Sydney? I have found a playgroup for children with developmental issues I haven't attended yet so can't comment, but will next week.

I'm in the Sutherland Shire and will be starting PlayConnect next Wednesday. Is that the playgroup you're referring to? I'm really looking forward to meeting other mums that have the same concerns as I do.

Marina: Thanks for the hug and a big hug right back for you. I've been reading your posts and I know you've had a difficult time recently. I'm sorry your little guy had a rough start to life and I hope that is all behind you now. The first couple of weeks are really hard so go easy on yourself. It does get better I promise. When I first found out there was something wrong I just sat on the floor, staring at him and wondering what I'm supposed to do with him now.

Yes, he's just turned 15 months and overall he scored just below average in his assessment earlier this month. It's unlikely he is on the spectrum although I have an appointment with an ASD professional in a few weeks to rule it out. Most days I am positive but yesterday with my girlfriend distressing him and Miss C making fun of him it really stung. I need to toughen up because there are some really ignorant people out there and unfortunately I'm probably going to encounter situations like this frequently. I'm grateful that DS is too young to understand what's going on.

QUOTE
Its great you started therapy so fast, the clinical psychologist who assesed my DS said starting now (hes 17.5 months) is too early and wait till 2...

I can understand why your clinical psychologist said this especially with FAHCSIA funding. Our paed didn't suggest therapy for DS either and just said to go home and do lots of activities and she'll reassess at 20 months. My problem was I didn't know how to interact with him so that's why I'm taking him to OT. She's assessing what his strengths and weaknesses are and she's also helping me by giving us activities to do at home. I'm on the waitlists for EI through Community Health/Learning Links but as I don't know how long the lists are I thought I'd just get started.

If you wanted to get a couple of sessions in you can ask your GP for a (EPC) Enhanced Primary Care Plan which will entitle you to 5 sessions of OT / ST/ PT etc under Medicare where 85% of the fees are claimable.

#20 mummy.to.one

Posted 04 February 2012 - 08:32 AM

Chiquita would you believe he only started pointing this week, before it was his whole hand with all fingers out, but this week he started doing it with just one finger, still no waving though.

Your on the other side of Sydney to me, I'm north west. The playgroup is run by children first I think, they have an OT and speech pathologist attend.

Our physio mentioned the epc we have to see Connors gp on monday to try and apply for it,

#21 lollipopp

Posted 04 February 2012 - 08:56 AM

Mummuy.to.one...people will stop saying to you "oh they will catch up" when you tell them you have a diagnosis of something thats when they shut up!
Thats what happened to me!!
My daughter has GDD ( 17 1.2 months ) & recently diagnosed with Autism ( 3 years )

I did 3 rounds of genetic testing for my DD when she got dx with GDD but all came up clear uncertain as to what has caused it
( I personally believe its the amount of testosterone in my body from when i fell pregnant from my PCOS as there is a link of PCO & Autism )

Joining a group is great! i was denial for a while & knew that my Mothers Group was ok to be with but now im realising how silly i was & i should have just joined a PlayConnect. DD is only 3 years old & ive now joined a SPecial Needs swimming program in my area & also joining a SN group which starts in a month.

There also may be a FB group for families of Special Needs. There is a FB site for the families of WA im sure its open to others if there are no others for the eastern states.

Good Luck with the journeys. You have your good days & your bad days. Just something so small you get so excited & i mean excited where others would be like oh yeh thats an every day sort of thing for me

Im glad this thread is back up & running again. Support is great & knowing your not alone.




#22 Marina_D

Posted 04 February 2012 - 11:02 AM

QUOTE (lollipopp @ 04/02/2012, 09:56 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Mummuy.to.one...people will stop saying to you "oh they will catch up" when you tell them you have a diagnosis of something thats when they shut up!
Thats what happened to me!!
My daughter has GDD ( 17 1.2 months ) & recently diagnosed with Autism ( 3 years )

I did 3 rounds of genetic testing for my DD when she got dx with GDD but all came up clear uncertain as to what has caused it
( I personally believe its the amount of testosterone in my body from when i fell pregnant from my PCOS as there is a link of PCO & Autism )

Joining a group is great! i was denial for a while & knew that my Mothers Group was ok to be with but now im realising how silly i was & i should have just joined a PlayConnect. DD is only 3 years old & ive now joined a SPecial Needs swimming program in my area & also joining a SN group which starts in a month.

There also may be a FB group for families of Special Needs. There is a FB site for the families of WA im sure its open to others if there are no others for the eastern states.

Good Luck with the journeys. You have your good days & your bad days. Just something so small you get so excited & i mean excited where others would be like oh yeh thats an every day sort of thing for me

Im glad this thread is back up & running again. Support is great & knowing your not alone.


Hi Lollipop,

My DS is 17.5m and was recently dx as GDD and is most likely to be on the spectrum. Now your DD is 3, how does she fair in terms of development? what age equivalent is she now? did you do any EI?

#23 lollipopp

Posted 04 February 2012 - 12:09 PM

Marina,
We have had EI since she was 18 months old ( at the time she was only just pulling herself to stand ) we had a private physio while we waited for our refereal for disability services. So in 18 months she has started to climb onto furniture, walk around furniture & now walks with us 1 handed. she cant stand on her own & hasnt taken any steps.
We are also getting help with disability services with Speech Therapy. Its taken me 1 year to teach her 2 signs which I still have to prompt her.
The speech assessor said DD has SEVERE GDD & Mild Autism.
I dont exactly know what age she showing " in medical terms" but to me i would say she is around a 12 months old. My DD#2 who is 15 months old ( who has health issues & was told she was going to lag gross motor wise & thankfully hasnst ) is already doing more than her by saying words, pointing, walking, climbing. So that is how i compare in terms of where my DD #1 is at.

I would say that she does everything in her own time. She will not do anything when prompted. Its been hard work the last year she has come forward in leaps & bounds but very slowly.
I guess if i look at the last year to someone it may not look like she has done alot but in DD#1 terms & what she has she has come in leaps & bounds.

This coming year now that she has been dx with Autism we have more access to more intervention. I am up'ing our Private Health Fund so i can get more money back & go private too. SO i thought if i so some private, some help from disability services ( which is govt ) & also some help from funding with Autism maybe this next year she will get a little further.

SO basically at 3 years old she is non verbal & isnt walking

Keep in mind not everyone is the same. Each child develops at their own stages. Just mine is a severe case & now we have the dx of Autism which has thrown a spanner in the works but its wouldnt change DD #1 at all as we knew our life is going to be a tough & rewarding one so the dx of autism just gives us more access to more EI & the funding to help us original.gif


#24 ~chiquita~

Posted 04 February 2012 - 07:53 PM

QUOTE
Chiquita would you believe he only started pointing this week, before it was his whole hand with all fingers out, but this week he started doing it with just one finger, still no waving though.


Yay! Way to go Connor!  tthumbs.gif That's awesome mummy.to.one, I bet you squealed with joy when he did that. J does the pointing with all his fingers out too and he's only been doing that for about 6 weeks. That's given me a little hope, maybe J will start pointing properly afterall. J waves but not always at appropriate times, he also doesn't clap hands.

That's a shame you're on the other side of Sydney, I hope the one I'm going to has therapists as well. I've been meaning to see my GP for the EPC plan myself, I just haven't gotten around to it yet!  rolleyes.gif

lollipopp  waves.gif

Thanks for posting and sharing your experiences with us. Would you be able to pm me a link to that fb page? I've done a search and can't find anything. I'm hoping PlayConnect will be able to give me contacts for some of those other groups you've mentioned.

QUOTE
Good Luck with the journeys. You have your good days & your bad days. Just something so small you get so excited & i mean excited where others would be like oh yeh thats an every day sort of thing for me


Thanks! Yes I know that excitement,  my 15 month old has just done something that a normal toddler has been doing since they were 10 months old excitement. It's these little achievements that I focus on when I'm having a bad day with him.    



#25 mummy.to.one

Posted 05 February 2012 - 08:06 AM

Chiquita you mentioned your DS had an assessment, where was that done as our gp is refusing to send us to a paed until 18months if you had the assessment through a chn I might go see ours.

Our ds's sound similar, with the whole hand point, your DS can wave but can't clap, Connor can clap but not wave. Your DS sounds a little more advanced in words if he is cling your dh by a word that is great. All the little things are so exciting when they do them, especially of its something other babies had done months and months ago.

You see an OT, did you find one yourself? We see a physio I wonder what the difference is?

Lollipop glad you now have the extra funding to help.





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