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Icy cold hands


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#1 Guest_lil*bears*mama_*

Posted 30 May 2009 - 12:02 PM

Hi all,
My DS (4&1/2 mnths) has really cold hands, they are like ice!  I have no idea what to do about it.
I try to warm them in mine when possible, but it's not often enough.
Mittens are out because he is very "grabby" and is also a determined hand chewer so it would just result in cold and wet hands...

Does anyone else have this problem? Is it normal? What do you do about it?

Thanks!
xx

#2 babyblessedxo

Posted 30 May 2009 - 02:27 PM

Yep Amelia is the same her hands are always cold, try as I might to keep them warm & dry... It just doesnt happen!

I have no idea either on how to keep them warm, nothing I have tried has worked!

#3 Akeyo

Posted 30 May 2009 - 02:38 PM

I think it's pretty normal at this age. Their circulation is still fairly immature and so they can have trouble self-regulating their body temperature.

I think as long as their chest/torso feels warm then they are warm enough.

Not much help though I know!

#4 zinnybee

Posted 30 May 2009 - 02:54 PM

Is he rugged up?
My child had cold hands till I found out he wasnt warm enough.Extra jumpers,singlets,skivvies done wonders!Also make sure his feet are warm by having thick socks on and slippers.Thats how I check if my kids are warm by their hands.Put on extra clothing.No problem since.
A baby always needs to wear more clothes than grown up as we have more body fat and also move around often.

#5 sal151

Posted 30 May 2009 - 06:09 PM

Cold hands and feet are perfectly normal at that age and are not a good indicator of whether your baby is warm enough or not. As a pp said their circulation system is immature and therefore hands and feet feel cold. So long as their back or stomach are warm then they are warm enough and you don't need to worry about cold hands or feet.

#6 zinnybee

Posted 30 May 2009 - 06:20 PM

Cold hands and feet are not normal!! Do you like when YOU have cold hands and feet,I BET YOU DONT AND AS SOON AS YOU RUG UP YOU FEEL BETTER or sit in front of the heater.

No wonder sooo many kids get sick...I saw a little baby(4-5 months old) out in this cold weather with no hat on or socks,shoes,and the wind was blowing her little head,I felt like saying something to that mother!

Edited by shimmershine, 31 May 2009 - 10:27 AM.


#7 Fillyjonk

Posted 30 May 2009 - 07:56 PM

Hmm, I think that they are quite normal zinny... Nobody is suggesting that a baby should be out in the cold with no clothes on, but if they are appropriately rugged up, then hands are not a good indicator of how warm they are.

The worst thing about cold hands is that icy touch on the breast at3:00 am.

#8 Honey~Baby

Posted 30 May 2009 - 08:02 PM

QUOTE
Cold hands and feet are perfectly normal at that age and are not a good indicator of whether your baby is warm enough or not. As a pp said their circulation system is immature and therefore hands and feet feel cold. So long as their back or stomach are warm then they are warm enough and you don't need to worry about cold hands or feet

I agree. This is what I have learnt not only from midwives but also in my own study as a childbirth educator.

#9 smudgiekiss

Posted 30 May 2009 - 08:10 PM

Both my kids had icey cold hands at night even rugged up with quilted long sleave sleeping bags.  I believe their circulation isn't what ours is because they don't move as much as we do.

I even resorted to massage before bed to try to improve the 3am icey breast grab that certainly wakes you up. I used to put his hands between my boobs to warm them while he was feeding. Poor little man wub.gif

I think they grow out of it.  My DS is 15 months now and I haven't noticed cold hands for awhile now.  It's gotta be related to their increased movement.

#10 mumaboo

Posted 30 May 2009 - 08:17 PM

Can I say my 12 week old only has cold hands when she IS cold, at night her hands are warmer now that she is in an extra layer and now she sleeps all night?
By the way, I put her in tops one size too big so the sleeves are long enough to go over her hands, but she can still chew her fingers if sh wants without soaking her top. hth

#11 sal151

Posted 30 May 2009 - 10:13 PM

Not insane zinnybee, just going on the information I have been given by professionals and by my own research. I would be more concerned with overheating a baby than cold hands or feet, due the the increased sids risk.

#12 Alina0210

Posted 30 May 2009 - 10:29 PM

My exchange student was telling me yesterday that when she was growing up she always had ice cold hands and feet... and they ended up doing lots and lots of tests and she has low iron levels.. now she takes medication and its much better.

#13 babyblessedxo

Posted 30 May 2009 - 10:41 PM

Im another one that has been told by Paed & Dr & Ob & Neonatologists that it is perfectly normal for a bubs hands & feet to be cold & sometimes even wet from cold sweat!

I hate that they are cold but they have all told me not to worry about it...

Even when A was in Hospital very very ill I would try putting socks over the hand that had the drip in to keep it warm & they told me not to worry about it!

I do try to keep her warm with singlets & Skivies & warm PJs & wraps & blankets...

I was also told not to put anything on a babies head when they are sleeping as they will over heat & increase the risk of SIDS!

Atleast that is all the info I have been given...

#14 Divine 37

Posted 30 May 2009 - 10:47 PM

Zinnybee as the others have said it is very normal.
Too much clothing can actually make a baby overheat.
Heck i even get cold hands when i am dressed warmly!

Edited by shimmershine, 31 May 2009 - 10:28 AM.


#15 Road_to_somewhere

Posted 30 May 2009 - 10:55 PM

Take a chill pill zinny.

Yes OP it can be normal, as long as your baby is appropriately dressed etc then it should be fine.

#16 *starfish*

Posted 30 May 2009 - 11:15 PM

It's true what pp's have said - it is not a true indication of body temp. That being said, you CAN also get body suits/ sleep suits that have the hand covers built in if it really concerns you original.gif
Hope that helps

Edited by *starfish*, 30 May 2009 - 11:15 PM.


#17 knielly

Posted 31 May 2009 - 08:39 AM

Some people naturally have cold hands and feet but this is completely normal. When I grew up my hands and feet were cold but it wasn't a problem. It only became a problem when I became 30 as I got some high blood glucose levels due to diabetes and the nerves were damaged in my hands and feet. After my nerves were damaged, I got Reynalds syndrome(diagnosed as a mild case by a doctor, where my hands and feet will go bluish. I now have to wear gloves and slippers and make sure I am warm to keep my hands and feet warm and the doctor said I can take a supplement to improve the circulation. So no it does sound like your child is ok and just like the phrase cold hands warm heart, not a medical problem.

#18 shimmershine

Posted 31 May 2009 - 10:30 AM

A couple of posts have been edited to remove personal attacks, so the topic can stay on track  wink.gif

#19 babyblessedxo

Posted 31 May 2009 - 11:23 AM

thanks for that shimmershine...

#20 Fillyjonk

Posted 31 May 2009 - 03:33 PM

Before I found out that cold hands are okay, I went out of my way to find suits with hand covers that would fit (have not seen any larger than 00). But he is a hand sucker, so they actually made the cold hands worse. Guh.

#21 Petvet

Posted 25 September 2015 - 06:19 PM

 zinnybee, on 30 May 2009 - 06:20 PM, said:

Cold hands and feet are not normal!! Do you like when YOU have cold hands and feet,I BET YOU DONT AND AS SOON AS YOU RUG UP YOU FEEL BETTER or sit in front of the heater.

No wonder sooo many kids get sick...I saw a little baby(4-5 months old) out in this cold weather with no hat on or socks,shoes,and the wind was blowing her little head,I felt like saying something to that mother!

I know this is an old thread, but if I found it, perhaps other people are reading as well. Cold hands and feet might not be normal for adults, but the previous posters who said its normal in babies because of immature circulation are correct. Icy extremities don't mean the baby is cold or uncomfortable.  It's a normal baby thing!

Babies do lose heat faster than adults because of a higher "surface area to body mass ratio", so they need more protection from the cold than we do.

That said, anecdotally, it seeks to me, kids may lose body heat faster than adults, but they seem LESS BOTHERED by cold. Ever notice how kids will jump right in a cold pool and have a great time while we adults are left shivering and miserable?

But in response to your last paragraph, no the people getting sick around you arent getting sick because they didn't bundle to go out in the cold. When it's cold outside it's not the temperature outside that directly makes people sick it's the fact that people stay inside to stay warm and are now in closer contact with other people in closed spaces, breathing the same air, which helps spread cold and influenza viruses. A child left out in the cold day-to-day would result in stress which would result in a suppressed immune system, which would in turn make him more likely to get sick, but no one is going to get sick from a walk across a parking lot or around the block without sufficient warm clothes. Cold temperatures do not directly make people sick. Viruses make people sick.

Edited by Petvet, 25 September 2015 - 06:21 PM.


#22 FeelingcLucky

Posted 25 September 2015 - 07:31 PM

I like your style Petvet... Going back through the archives of EB and correcting old threads one post at a time! ;)




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