Jump to content

Stomach Migraine
Ever heard of it?


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 ~naturally~

Posted 01 May 2010 - 08:34 PM

My 6 year old son has been diagnosed with stomach migraine. I have never heard of it nor do i know anyone with it.

can someone supply me with more information and what do/did you do to eradicate it...if possible

Thanks

#2 ~naturally~

Posted 01 May 2010 - 08:45 PM

stomach migraine is different to a stomach bug as a stomach bug lasts for a few hours to 24/48 hours. Migraines last for a few hours and are reoccurring sporadically.

My son gets stomach cramps, reflux and sometimes nausea but never vomits. He might get it for 4 days in a row, usually at night and then he'll be fine for a week or 2. Then, it comes back...it has been going on for a few months now.

#3 Tan21

Posted 01 May 2010 - 08:46 PM

My DD's daughter mentioned this to me not too long ago, as she had it as a kid.  I had mentioned my DD seems to throw up alot after being at a party or nervous situation, which is not related to the food she has eaten.  I am more inclined to think my DD's is nerves rather than anything else.

I googled it at the time and found a few interesting links.....

http://www.migrainesinfo.com.au/abdominal_migraines.htm



#4 ~naturally~

Posted 01 May 2010 - 08:52 PM

The doctor said to give him Panadol and Buscopan when it occurs and he will have it for anywhere between 10- 15 years. I have been to a kinesioligist (sp?) who has put him on some herbs to help with stomach acid. This has helped to ease the bouts but not eradicated it. I am not happy to give him Panadol on such a regular basis so am looking for alternatives.

Thanks for link Tan21  original.gif

#5 Guest_jaicorbe_*

Posted 01 May 2010 - 08:52 PM

When I was told my DS had cyclic vomiting syndrome, I was told it can also be referred to as obdominal migraines. I assume what your child has would be similar then but without the vomiting.

There are some great support groups for CVS out there. Some very expensive anti nausea meds usually given to chemo patients can be given to relieve some sufferers, but it didnt work for my son.

Most sufferers will have some sort of a trigger for their episodes. This is usually food, but cna also be environmental or stress related. HTH

#6 limakilo

Posted 01 May 2010 - 10:08 PM

I used to get them in my late teens.
I would get severe bloating, from right under my boobs to under my underwear line, my stomach would swell like a balloon. I never got vomiting though. I figured out some triggers as time went on, stess, cheese, tomato, anything acidic. Mersydol would help with the pain (but that's a bit much for your young child I guess) and eno's was great. I eventually grew out of it, strangely enough.

#7 kekaco

Posted 02 May 2010 - 12:10 AM

My son also had these. I had his eyes tested, turned out he needed glassses. Suddenly the 'childhood migraines' stopped when he started wearing his glasses.

They are horrible and painful for them.

#8 Guest_lifesamission_*

Posted 02 May 2010 - 07:48 AM

As Jaicorbe mentioned with regards to CVS, her son & mine both suffer from them. It is called an abdominal migraine. My son has them monthly & it floors him for 24 to 48 hours. We have a system in place when we see it coming.He is 8 & weighs a tad over 20kg.Each time he has one he loses a kilo.We have peadiasure tetra packs & electrolyte replacements on hand so he can ride it out.He does require admission when it gets too hard to handle. Sometimes the panadol aggravates his stomach more, it's a catch 22.I hope you get to the bottom of it.Jaicorbe & I have spent nearly 5 years yakking online about our boys & this situation.

#9 kaishra

Posted 02 May 2010 - 06:13 PM

I was diagnosed with that when I was younger, infact it was appendicitis! but cause my symptoms didn't perfectly match it they never even bothered looking into that, thank goodness we finally found a dr who looked outside the square and packed me off to hospital for surgery, turns out it was ready to burst!

#10 ~MakkaPakka~

Posted 02 May 2010 - 06:20 PM

I had this as a teenager.

#11 Guest_jaicorbe_*

Posted 03 May 2010 - 06:57 AM

QUOTE (lifesamission @ 02/05/2010, 07:48 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As Jaicorbe mentioned with regards to CVS, her son & mine both suffer from them. It is called an abdominal migraine. My son has them monthly & it floors him for 24 to 48 hours. We have a system in place when we see it coming.He is 8 & weighs a tad over 20kg.Each time he has one he loses a kilo.We have peadiasure tetra packs & electrolyte replacements on hand so he can ride it out.He does require admission when it gets too hard to handle. Sometimes the panadol aggravates his stomach more, it's a catch 22.I hope you get to the bottom of it.Jaicorbe & I have spent nearly 5 years yakking online about our boys & this situation.


Wow, a bit OT here but geez...lol....its been a while hasnt it?

I havent caught you online much lately though. Hope youre ok.

#12 sam_k

Posted 03 May 2010 - 10:09 AM

My DS was diagnosed 2 years ago after repeated hospitalisations in the middle of the night with what we thought was apendicitis (finally got sick of being told they had no idea what was wrong, and got a referral to the paed).

The day before an attack he gets all of the migraine symptoms - won't eat, hyper-sensitive to light and noise, unsteady on his feet.  The vomiting and the abdominal cramping follow that.

He takes a sandomigran tablet every night.  We've tried taking him off them a few times, and he always has an attack 7 days later.  So the paed thinks he will be on them for a while.  He was getting a migraine every couple of weeks, and he's only had 1 breakthrough migraine in the time he's been on the tablets.

We've had eyes etc checked and everything's fine.  We think it's hereditory.  I figured out that I suffered from the same thing when I was a kid.  Mine changed to standard migraines at puberty, and I've not got them under control with regular visits to an osteo.

#13 ~chic~

Posted 03 May 2010 - 10:35 AM

dd2 gets it time to time. Mainly during the night. Thankfully she is outgrowing it and its not as bad as it used to be.




#14 ~naturally~

Posted 03 May 2010 - 07:12 PM

Thankyou all for your replies.

it's nice to know that we are not the only ones going through it.

Hopefully things will ease as he gets older sad.gif ..... one can only hope

#15 Guest_jaicorbe_*

Posted 03 May 2010 - 07:53 PM

DS#1 had has it since he was a baby and it got a hell of a lot worse as he got older. He is now on a program with the local hospital for children with chronic illness. He gets to by pass triage now and they no longer trial oral fluid, straight to IV and they are getting us a bed in the paed ward as soon as they see the card we present with the program details on it.

I was told years back when we got the dx that about 40% of children will simply outgrow it, another 40% will develop into the more typical presentation of migraines and another 20% never outgrow it but it might get worse or better.

I know of people from the support group that LAM and I used to be in that as adults were unable to work and could spend months in hospital or are now only peg fed as they cant tolerate food of any kind etc.

Im not saying that to scare you. Its just that when I mentioned it on here months back after a particularly bed episode DS had, no one seemed aware of how severe it can be. For us, DS can become unconscious within 4-6 hours while still needing to vomit and so he needs emergency medical intervention. He crashes badly. Unfortunately for him, meds dont work and the usual oral rehydration methods actually make him worse. His episodes can last from 6-8 hours (dont need admission for them) to a terrible one we had once for three weeks (that was being able to walk,stand or sit and vomiting every 15 minutes day and night).

my advice would be to try to find triggers for your child (mine is mainly stress and gastro triggers severe eps). To have a written plan of management for day care/kinder/school/family/friends to follow. Also (sorry cant remember the age of your child) I find its helpful to allow the child as much input into their own care and self management as they can handle to give them a feeling of control over something that can be quite distressing.


#16 Guest_lifesamission_*

Posted 03 May 2010 - 09:28 PM

Hi J, sorry if it was a little over the top. As for us, it's the same old same old.S is really getting stressed about year 4 the work is getting harder & his stress is through the roof.Lots of gastro too.Got to love stress & triggers.Love to you all.B




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.