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24 hour stay only after birth?


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#26 MarlaMoo

Posted 13 May 2010 - 01:47 PM

With DS I gave birth at 6.15am and went home 9am the following morning - I was required to stay 24 hours as I'd been given an epi.  With DD I gave birth at 1am and was home by 11am.  I was packed and ready to come home at about 6.30am with DD as I just wanted to get home and 'get into it !'

Most birth centres encourage you to go home as soon as you're ready to and then they come past every day/second day for a week or two to see how you're doing - and generally you have your primary midwives mobile number to call at any time if you need to talk to someone about anything.

#27 whydoibother

Posted 13 May 2010 - 01:52 PM

DD in a private hospital I stayed 4 nights.
DS went private in a regional public-they said a minimum 48 hours stay-I left just short of this as I had DS in the evening and I left at lunch. I bought him back the next day for all the stuff that needed to be done as they do not do home midwife visits here.

#28 Feral-Lausii

Posted 13 May 2010 - 01:57 PM

My local hospital has a standard stay of 3 days. I would have loved to have taken them up on that offer with food delivered to my bed and no washing. But had other kids to get home to. I am in the country though, hospital probably not as busy as city hospitals.

#29 charlie23

Posted 13 May 2010 - 02:18 PM

DD was born in a public country hospital & I was in for 5 nights, they wanted to keep me in another night but my parents were over from the USA and had limited time before they flew back.

DS was born in a private hospital & I was in for 4/5 nights, mainly because I wanted to get BF correct this time as DD it had been an utter failure with no support & I wanted a break & to get one on one time with DS.



#30 kotchiornok

Posted 13 May 2010 - 02:26 PM

Funnily enough for 2 of my children I couldn't wait to get home from the hospital and actually cried when I was told I needed to stay longer. For the others I LOVED my hospital time. It was so nice to just sit in bed and have someone bring me meals (any type of meals) that I didn't have to cook and to (at least) take care of washing of baby stuff and bedsheets.

At RHS they tend to discharge after 24 hours from the birth center as the philosophy is to have the most "natural" birth possible in a hospital and part of this is getting mother and baby back to their home environment as soon as they can.

Personally, for a first time, I needed more help with breastfeeding than this and although in hospital you might have to insist on calling the midwifes every time you have trouble it is probably easier and less isolating to do this than being at home and having to look up services on the internet and call them up for help when you are struggling. Also the help won't be immediately available at home - you have to make appointments, whereas in a hospital there is (in theory) people available straight away (or at least within 30 mins or so).

On the normal maternity ward at RHS they do expect a longer stay (I think it is up to 3 days). Sometimes they might encourage you to leave earlier, but if you do want to stay then don't be worried to ask, and keep asking (might need to mention it to a few different people on different shifts before your wishes are taken into account). If they have the beds available I can't imagine they'd throw you any earlier than 3 days after baby, but I guess there are no guarantees.

#31 toni147

Posted 13 May 2010 - 02:27 PM

From the looks of the many posts here it seems that people's opinions on how long you should stay is based on:
1) Previous experiences in hospitals
2) Previous experiences with midwives and nurses (mainly around b/fing)
3) Level of support at home

Someone posted that in deciding on a hospital/birthing centre you should examine your reasons for wanting a shorter or longer stay and how important it is to you. Sounds sensible to me.

My experiences in a private maternity hospital have been gorgeous midwives and nurses who are very supportative and leave me alone a lot; 3 tasty and healthy meals (with a glass of wine if I wanted it) a day delivered to me at sensible times; flexible visiting hours so friends can pop by; night nurses who would take the baby to the nursery if I had a long labour and needed sleep; and a lovely (and mostly soundproof) room with a double bed my partner could stay over with me in and comfy chairs/armchairs. With DD1 I loved that I had support and assistance when I needed it. With DD2 I loved that they left me alone most of the time and didn't bug me with silly visits to offer drugs and tests, but that I got to take a break from housework, cooking and a very busy 20 month old. This time around I'm looking forward to having a little holiday with the baby before I come home to a by then 5 year old and 3.5 yo, and all the associated demands on a SAHM.

Anyway, if your local hospital doesn't offer what you want in terms of a stay, make some calls and see if you can go to another one that does offer what you're after. Unfortunately the only way to get an "in" to a lot of hospitals is to have an OB who delivers there. Personally I'd rather pass on the OB and just go to the hospital of my choice an have midwives only. A midwife delivered my first, and a midwife did most of the supervision on the second, so I'm not sure why the health system insists that I have to have an overpaid OB in order to deliver at the place of my choice. But hey that's a whole other topic.  rolleyes.gif

Good luck with it all!

#32 sigh

Posted 13 May 2010 - 02:32 PM

The private hospital I'm at will send a midwife to you every day if you go home in under 5 days. But my obs said he's not keen on letting me go home early unless breast feeding is established.

#33 RedTulip

Posted 13 May 2010 - 02:35 PM

My first was 48hrs, 2nd was 24hrs and last was just 4hr stay

I stayed at a public hospital, was cared for by midwives and had great stays all 3 times. I would much prefer to be at home with my new baby than in a hospital environment!! Even more so when I had two other children to think about so they could also bond with their new sister and bub could bond with dad original.gif

The 3rd birth if you stay on the short program so 24hrs or less, they send out a mothercare person free of charge for 6hrs a day for a week post birth to do housework, run errands, take kids to school, etc. It was great having extra help original.gif original.gif

#34 First124

Posted 13 May 2010 - 02:43 PM

Public Hospital

Ive been told to expect anything between 4-24hrs stay, for a 'normal' birth. They said it mainly depends on when you arrive and if everything goes smoothly.

My midwife said that the ward is the last place you want to be with a new born as there will be 3 other new mums with bubs and partners and visitors. All going well i want to be out of there asap!

And as someone else said earlier - nothing like your own bed, bathroom & FOOD!

My midwife said if your ok to go, you will be pushed if there is someone more 'needy' for the bed (rather than you just being unconfident etc) my midwife will come and see me everyday for a week and then when im ready, visits will drop down.

Im with MGP so same midwife all the way thru original.gif

#35 kotchiornok

Posted 13 May 2010 - 03:50 PM

QUOTE (RedTulip @ 13/05/2010, 02:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The 3rd birth if you stay on the short program so 24hrs or less, they send out a mothercare person free of charge for 6hrs a day for a week post birth to do housework, run errands, take kids to school, etc. It was great having extra help original.gif  original.gif


Wow!
Was this in NSW?
How do you organize this?
I'd give birth in the hospital car-park for 6hrs help at home per day!

#36 M0NI

Posted 13 May 2010 - 04:09 PM

I hated being in hospital both times I had my kids... I had share rooms, one with 2 others and one with 3 others and both times there were loud, inconsiderate women who assumed it was ok to talk loudly on the phone at all hours, one woman was constantly eating so all I could hear was the crinkle of chip/biscuit packets all the bloody time she also had so many visitors in her 'room' that they would bump my sons cot through the curtain. Which being on wheels would shoot across the room and hit my bed! I hated that I would get woken up by the nurses every few hours with a thermomitor in my ear and the blood pressure machine pumping up on my arm. And the lady beside me last time would let her baby cry for about 10 mins before she would bother to pick him up... even during the night which would wake up all the other babies in the room rant.gif I went home 3 days after number 1 and 2 after number 2. The only reason I stayed the extra day with number 1 was because my c-sect wound was infected and I was in excruciating pain. I had c-sects with both. I didn't get much help with breastfeeding either... They all told me different things and nothing any of them said was much help at all. My mum was more help! I am dreading the hospital stay I will have to have with this one more than the c-sect lol laughing2.gif

#37 kittykat2010

Posted 13 May 2010 - 04:09 PM

Great responses - thankyou!

" So, a genuine question, why do you want to stay in hospital? Is it a security thing, in that there are professionals there in case something happens? Why would you not rather be at home, resting in your own bed, having what you want to eat and when you want it and be able to get to know your baby without an audience?"

* I have hypoplastic breasts and am worried about my milk supply and breastfeeding generally as I dont have normal nipples as well.

* I have heard horror stories about post birth complications that I fear would not be picked up on by a midwife visiting me at home for a short period.

Other than the above I guess I am just a little concerned with such a short stay (i dont want to be in the hospital for two weeks!) as I have had spinal surgery and its my first baby so I guess i just want to make sure everything can go as smoothly as possible..

I guess all I can do is wait until the big day rolls around!

Thanks again ladies..

#38 Caramel Queen

Posted 13 May 2010 - 04:17 PM

I actually found the home midwife program FAR better than the support I was (not) getting in hospital. I had the same lovely midwife giving me the same advice, one on one, for around an hour a day. I also had her phone number and could call day or night if I felt I needed to.

The maternity ward was so busy and noisy, I couldn't get much rest and I also didn't feel like DS was 'my' baby as I had to get permission to do anything with him (bathe him, couldn't take him out of the ward etc) so I felt my confidence grew much quicker when I was home.

Also day 3/4/5 is often when the baby blues hits, so I wouldn't want to be coming home on that day anyway - better to get back settled in at home while you're still on a high!  happy.gif

Also it takes a good 4-6 weeks for BFing to truly be 'established' so the extra nights in hospital at the beginning don't make much difference IMO. I think it's in the 2nd and 3rd weeks that it can be really difficult - and when it pays to have other support (ABA, LC, books etc) lined up.

I agree with PPs though, you should choose your caregiver and birth place based on whether they can meet (within reason) what you want in the postnatal period. original.gif

ETA:

QUOTE
* I have heard horror stories about post birth complications that I fear would not be picked up on by a midwife visiting me at home for a short period.


Remember you will already have been in hospital for 24-48 hours (they say 24 hours, but they really mean '1 night' because if you give birth at 3am they're not going to send you home at 3am the next morning! wink.gif) and if there's any hint of post-birth complications you won't be allowed on the early discharge program anyway. Like I mentioned above, you have the phone number for your home visit midwife plus you can always call back to the maternity ward if you were concerned about anything (bleeding, temperature etc). Also - the best place to pick up an infection (both you and newborn baby) is the hospital! Germy places they are! wink.gif

Good luck original.gif

Edited by plainjayne, 13 May 2010 - 04:22 PM.


#39 Kim

Posted 13 May 2010 - 10:54 PM

I stayed 6 days for DS1 in a private hospital..  at the time i felt a bit confined and wanted to go home, but in hindsight, that time enabled me to learn and establish breastfeeding, so it was well worth it.

DS2, I was in 5 days, didn't need help, but loved that break from my 19 mth old toddler at home.. loved every minute of that stay with my 3 hot meals a day and the peacefulness of the private room that overlooked a paddock full of horsies.

DD, I stayed under 48 hrs in a public hospital.. I would have discharged the same day, but unfortunately I had tested positive for strep b and had had gestational diabetes, so my baby had to be monitored, i was discharged as quickly as I could be though

I didn't want to be in hospital this time, I needed no help and my boys are now both at school, so wasn't going home to boisterous toddlers.

I think staying in for 6 days with number 1 was crucial for me.. I don't know how i would have gone breastfeeding and I know I would have been pretty overwhelmed had i been discharged in 24 hrs

I think it is a very personal choice, some people like the security of hospital, some don't, but for a first time mum, i think the stay needs to be a bit longer.. assuming of course the midwives are helpful and you are learning something there

#40 mumtomakandissy

Posted 13 May 2010 - 11:00 PM

Yes it happens and is ridiculous, particulary if you are a first time mum. Doesn't happen everywhere though. I had DD2 ( and having another bub any day now) at our local " country " hospital and with DD2 had no complications, she fed well from the start and I stayed three nights. Even then the nurses told me " to stay longer if I wanted".

I still got the follow up at home also.

Depends where you are. I have found most friends who have only had the 24 hour stay have been in larger regional areas or cities.

#41 littlepickle

Posted 13 May 2010 - 11:11 PM

I stayed 24 hours after my first birth followed by 4 days of daily home visits. My second I stayed 8 hours, folowed by 5 days of midwife visits.
loved going home.

littlepickle

#42 mlto

Posted 13 May 2010 - 11:17 PM

I went home 24 hours after I had my last 3 children.

With #4 I can't believe they sent me home after 24 hours, I had PPH 6 hours after DS was born and I was feeling faint and not eating the next day. They sent me home and sent a midwife round 2 days later, she came one other day and after that nothing.

Edited by coopey-doo, 13 May 2010 - 11:17 PM.


#43 Happypinks

Posted 13 May 2010 - 11:21 PM

Sounds right!

I gave birth at the royal north shore at 1:35am sunday morning and left at 8:30pm that evening once the paed had seen my DD.

I was on the midwife plan where i have my own midwife through the pregnancy and birth (although mine was off when i had DD) and they allow you to go home 6 hours after birth but not less than 6 hours. They encourage you to go home as soon as comfortable so you can feel more relaxed at home with baby and in your own environment. I then had the midwife come and see me every other day for a week, so four visits in total, to check how i was going and baby too.

In hindsight, i would have definitely stayed longer. I had a terrible time trying to breast feed and honestly feel that if i had stayed in longer and ensured i was getting the help i needed, i would have been more of a success in that area. Next time round (were in Brissy now) i will be staying in for at least 2 or 3 days or until i am confident with the feeding.

Make sure you get all the support you want and as much as you may not like hospitals (i didnt) you can benefit from their help and assistance in certain areas...so stay until youre ready to go home.

Good luck and congrats too.

#44 ~*luvmytribe*~

Posted 13 May 2010 - 11:29 PM

I had DS3 at Westmead and was discharged 4 hours after birth! I didnt even make it from delivery to a ward. He was my 3rd though, no complications, no stitching etc. We had a midwife visit each day for the first 3 and then that was pretty much it. The midwife coinsidently lived at the opposite end of our Rd and said if we needed her at all to just knock on the door lol

#45 Acidulous Osprey

Posted 13 May 2010 - 11:36 PM

My hospital birth with an epidural, I went home about 4 hours after the birth.  I am curious as to the logic of having to stay simply because of an epidural.  I had one with my stillborn son and one with DS3 and it was never an issue.

I gave birth in NZ so had follow up from my midwives for 6 weeks.  Daily visits tapering off over time.

#46 Soontobegran

Posted 13 May 2010 - 11:50 PM

QUOTE
Why do you need to stay in hospital?

If you had an uncomplicated labour and delivery and both you and the baby are fine then I don't see why you would be in hospital




Why ?
It is because that is what some mums like to do. You don't have to understand their reasoning, you do what is right for you and that is all that you should be concerned about.

#47 Soontobegran

Posted 14 May 2010 - 12:18 AM


As a midwife who has witnessed the gradual decline in days spent in hospital post delivery, I can tell you that with this decline in length of stay has come a decline in the number of women successfully breast feeding their babies.

Early discharge is absolutely fine for those who have had previous babies and successful feeding histories or those first time mums whose babies have attached to the breast , are sucking well, are not jaundiced and their milk is coming in.
HOWEVER early discharge is often an absolute disaster in terms of successful breast feeding for those mums who have the opposite experience.
Having the midwife visit every day for the next week is not much use when it is EVERY feed that the mother needs help with! What does she do for the other 8 feeds?  She will start doubting her ability, she will be concerned her baby is starving and she will reach for the can of formula!

So NO, early discharge is not ideal for everyone, a mum who had never had attachment problems  or engorgement problems , jaundice baby issues or one of the myriad of other issues which can affect one's post delivery experience will never appreciate the difference a few extra days in hospital can make to some women's long term ability to cope with their new babies.

If 24 hour or less discharge is requested by a patient and all is well with mum's health and baby's ability to suck then it is absolutely OK BUT it should NOT be forced upon those women whom do not meet this criteria.
Personally there are times when I go to great lengths to advocate on behalf of a mum who needs more time---sometimes it is a win---sometimes not and I feel terribly upset when I see someone who is in no way prepared to go home being sent home anyway! sad.gif

#48 Guest_cathode_*

Posted 14 May 2010 - 12:33 AM

QUOTE (kittykat2010 @ 13/05/2010, 09:59 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How long did you stay in hospital after the birth and was it enough?

I was private so allowed to stay pretty much as long as I liked - and I used it to full advantage (interrogating midwives for the first baby, and resting from the one/s at home for the other 2 babies).

I had a friend have her baby (her first) in public hospital and she was pretty much booted out after 24hrs as she was a no complications.

#49 blossomdeary

Posted 14 May 2010 - 11:02 AM

QUOTE
I can tell you that with this decline in length of stay has come a decline in the number of women successfully breast feeding their babies.


This is one of the major reasons I changed my mind about having this baby in a public hospital. Getting the breastfeeding right is so important to me after problems with DS. I am not fully covered by PHI so I will be out of pocket a fair bit (hence the decision between public & private)... but it's the experience I want and I don't mind staying in hospital as long as it takes!

To me - the labour part was the easy bit! It's the care afterwards that makes all the difference to me.

Edited by blossomdeary, 14 May 2010 - 11:03 AM.


#50 kittykat2010

Posted 17 May 2010 - 12:34 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 14/05/2010, 12:18 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As a midwife who has witnessed the gradual decline in days spent in hospital post delivery, I can tell you that with this decline in length of stay has come a decline in the number of women successfully breast feeding their babies.

Early discharge is absolutely fine for those who have had previous babies and successful feeding histories or those first time mums whose babies have attached to the breast , are sucking well, are not jaundiced and their milk is coming in.
HOWEVER early discharge is often an absolute disaster in terms of successful breast feeding for those mums who have the opposite experience.
Having the midwife visit every day for the next week is not much use when it is EVERY feed that the mother needs help with! What does she do for the other 8 feeds?  She will start doubting her ability, she will be concerned her baby is starving and she will reach for the can of formula!

So NO, early discharge is not ideal for everyone, a mum who had never had attachment problems  or engorgement problems , jaundice baby issues or one of the myriad of other issues which can affect one's post delivery experience will never appreciate the difference a few extra days in hospital can make to some women's long term ability to cope with their new babies.

If 24 hour or less discharge is requested by a patient and all is well with mum's health and baby's ability to suck then it is absolutely OK BUT it should NOT be forced upon those women whom do not meet this criteria.
Personally there are times when I go to great lengths to advocate on behalf of a mum who needs more time---sometimes it is a win---sometimes not and I feel terribly upset when I see someone who is in no way prepared to go home being sent home anyway! sad.gif



This makes so much sense to me - I had a feeling this is one of the negatives of being sent home so soon after birth (but didnt really know as havent had a baby yet!) I REALLY want to breastfeed my baby and have heard women with Hypoplastic breasts can have bigger issues in this department. Thanks for confirming my thoughts..




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