Jump to content

How often did/do you breastfeed your newborn baby?


  • Please log in to reply
67 replies to this topic

#1 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 09:51 PM

For how long?

I know it varies from baby to baby but I am trying to arm myself with as much knowledge as possible.

I would even love to hear some routines if anyone can give the time to type it original.gif

Thanks.

ETA: Stupid question I know, but I struggled with DS and I had a terrible postpartum which resulted in putting him on the bottle and this time I want to be as confident as possible and know what to expect. I am so worried I will have PND and won't be able to get my head around everything.

Edited by OneProudMum, 24 February 2011 - 09:59 PM.


#2 liveworkplay

Posted 24 February 2011 - 09:54 PM

As often as they were hungry? huh.gif My babies have been exclusively BF and have fed every 2 to 3 hours as a newborn around the clock. They were all pretty efficient and quickly went from a hour feeding in the frist few days to about 10 min each side by a week or so old and then 5 min each side afet that (or there abouts, I never really timed them original.gif )

Edited by liveworkplay, 24 February 2011 - 09:54 PM.


#3 Guest_ladidadida_*

Posted 24 February 2011 - 09:54 PM

DS fed every 4 hours or so for the first week or two and then he fed every two hours at least until about 6 months (including at night from about 2 months until 5 months)

DD fed maybe every 4-5 hours for the first week or so and then averaged out to probably evry 3-4 hours.

ETA: We didn't really have much of a routine, I just fed them when they wanted it. The only 'routine' kind of thing we tried to do was a regular night bed time.

Edited by ladidadida, 24 February 2011 - 09:56 PM.


#4 bestjobever

Posted 24 February 2011 - 09:55 PM

I fed my newborn baby whenever it was hungry... its not rocket science original.gif So anywhere from 2-4 hourly.

Forget any advice about a strict 4 hourly feeding schedule for a newborn... you will just end up with a low milk supply doing this

#5 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 09:57 PM

It probably sounds like a stupid question, but I tried feeding my DS and had a lot of trouble. I just want to know a little bit about what I am to expect.



#6 Nobody Cool

Posted 24 February 2011 - 09:59 PM

My DS wanted to be fed bang on every three hours as a newborn baby. I demand fed so if he was going through a growth spurt or it it was a really hot day he would feed more regularly. His hunger cry was pretty easy to read though, so he left me in no doubt as to when he needed a feed.

Agree with PP on avoiding "scheduled" feeds though. Very detrimental to supply. I have seen some books recommend this still, unfortunately.

ETA: A great little catchphrase I picked up from EB is "when in doubt, whip 'em out". Gospel.

Edited by Shady Lane, 24 February 2011 - 10:01 PM.


#7 ~river song~

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:00 PM

QUOTE (bestjobever @ 24/02/2011, 10:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I fed my newborn baby whenever it was hungry... its not rocket science original.gif So anywhere from 2-4 hourly.

Forget any advice about a strict 4 hourly feeding schedule for a newborn... you will just end up with a low milk supply doing this


How do you know they are hungry versus something else being wrong? Or every time they cry do you feed them? unsure.gif
This is a genuine question cause I'm facing soon. I want to BF but having a baby attached to my boob 24/7 not sure how long before I went loony

Edited by ~Starbuck~, 24 February 2011 - 10:02 PM.


#8 Alina0210

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:00 PM

All the time. As a newborn I would feed anytime they whinged.

Eta: how did I know, I would check bum, then feed..... Usually feeding covers the cuddle need.

Edited by Alina0210, 24 February 2011 - 10:02 PM.


#9 Guest_mummy4eva_*

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:01 PM

DS1 was a 3 hourly feeder & DS2 was a 2 hourly feeder.

As newborns they didn't have routines as such. With DS1 I followed the feed play sleep routine but with DS2 I just followed his lead.

#10 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:02 PM

QUOTE (~Starbuck~ @ 24/02/2011, 11:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How do you know they are hungry versus something else being wrong? Or every time they cry do you feed them? unsure.gif


I want to know this too! I can't believe this is my 2nd and I have to ask these questions. DS is 7 though. It feels like forever ago!

#11 briandrea

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:02 PM

Feed On Demand - baby's demand original.gif  Unless your baby has health issues, the only person you need to listen to is your baby. Feeding works on a supply and demand basis and babies know hoow much to feed to ensure that you build enough of a supply to meet their needs. Also, remember that your breast is not only a source of food but also comfort and this is why they will want to nurse frequently. Be confident and trust your baby.

P.S. Yes, it probably will be about every 2 hours ( from beginning of one feed to the next, so sometimes there will only be an hour or so between actuall feeds) but that is normal. It is exhausting so make sure that your support people are nurturing you so that you can nurture your baby original.gif.

#12 m2j

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:03 PM

Constantly LOL!

#13 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:03 PM

Wow this is going to sound so selfish and rude... but you mean to tell me that I will possibly have my breasts out for about 10 hours a day?

#14 briandrea

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:04 PM

QUOTE
Wow this is going to sound so selfish and rude... but you mean to tell me that I will possibly have my breasts out for about 10 hours a day?


Yep, parenting is a 24/7 job.

#15 ~river song~

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:05 PM

QUOTE (OneProudMum @ 24/02/2011, 11:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Wow this is going to sound so selfish and rude... but you mean to tell me that I will possibly have my breasts out for about 10 hours a day?



laughing2.gif thats what I thought. My main thing is how the heck do I know they are hungry versus them being sick/in pain/ cold/hot or something else making them cry or unsettled.

#16 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:05 PM

QUOTE (briandrea @ 24/02/2011, 11:02 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Feed On Demand - baby's demand original.gif  Unless your baby has health issues, the only person you need to listen to is your baby. Feeding works on a supply and demand basis and babies know hoow much to feed to ensure that you build enough of a supply to meet their needs. Also, remember that your breast is not only a source of food but also comfort and this is why they will want to nurse frequently. Be confident and trust your baby.

P.S. Yes, it probably will be about every 2 hours ( from beginning of one feed to the next, so sometimes there will only be an hour or so between actuall feeds) but that is normal. It is exhausting so make sure that your support people are nurturing you so that you can nurture your baby original.gif .


I don't know why but I am really anxious about breastfeeding.

#17 Guest_janedoe2010_*

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:05 PM

Whenever they wanted it.

If they were crying and all other needs were met, then I would feed them.

Newborn babies don't need routine.

A sling can be a help if they do feed a lot.  original.gif

#18 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:07 PM

QUOTE (briandrea @ 24/02/2011, 11:04 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yep, parenting is a 24/7 job.


I think I know that already, considering I have a child.

I am just a bit older this time around and I had a terrible postpartum. I want something better. I really think it contributed to PND.

#19 Mamabear2010

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:07 PM

I've struggled to get a good routine with my ds (7.5 months). I try 'feed, play, sleep' but he doesn't usually want to.

For the first month or so, my ds fed for about 20 mins each side, every 3 hours. I would often have to poke and prod him  because he'd fall asleep. I used to change his nappy between each side.

From 5 o'clock onwards, my boobs always felt very empty. I got concerned and rang aba. They said there is milk there and it's actually very good for brain development. So don't fret in the evenings when your breasts feel soft.

The ABA helpline and website are fantastic. Use them as much as you need.

Good luck

Eta- I watched the baby language DVD (can't remember the proper name??). It helped me identify my ds's hungry cry. Although, I generally follow the motto of 'when in doubt, feed'.

Also- a guide like this is useful for reference: http://www.ngala.com.au/files/files/125_Se...od_Sleepers.pdf

Edited by Mamabear2010, 24 February 2011 - 10:14 PM.


#20 Nobody Cool

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:07 PM

Just to answer PPs on how to know when bubs is hungry. I actually kept a piece of paper and would write down the times of feeds at first just to get a grasp on the length of feeds and length of time between feeds. Only needed to do it for a few days and then I got a handle on it a bit more.

You'll also get good at "translating" your babies cries after a while and know that they sound different and communicate different needs. Mine also fell into a feed-play-sleep routine so I would know he'd be crying for a feed as soon as he woke up.

#21 ~river song~

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:08 PM

QUOTE (OneProudMum @ 24/02/2011, 11:05 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I don't know why but I am really anxious about breastfeeding.


Same. I want to do it so much but not sure I have the stamina by the sounds of it. I'm not going to pretend I'm a matyr but having a baby on my boob constantly sounds like a receipe for PND for me.
I'll give it a shot but its so daunting knowing I'm the one responsible for his food and comfort, DH can't do it and thats scary huh.gif

#22 ~river song~

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:10 PM

QUOTE (Shady Lane @ 24/02/2011, 11:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Just to answer PPs on how to know when bubs is hungry. I actually kept a piece of paper and would write down the times of feeds at first just to get a grasp on the length of feeds and length of time between feeds. Only needed to do it for a few days and then I got a handle on it a bit more.

You'll also get good at "translating" your babies cries after a while and know that they sound different and communicate different needs. Mine also fell into a feed-play-sleep routine so I would know he'd be crying for a feed as soon as he woke up.



Thank you that sounds like good advice, I'll give it a go original.gif

#23 bestjobever

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:11 PM

QUOTE (~Starbuck~ @ 24/02/2011, 11:00 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How do you know they are hungry versus something else being wrong? Or every time they cry do you feed them? unsure.gif
This is a genuine question cause I'm facing soon. I want to BF but having a baby attached to my boob 24/7 not sure how long before I went loony



Good question. You get to know the different cries and you kind of know how long its been from the last feed. You eliminate other things like nappy, a cuddle, burp etc and if there is still crying them it is obviously hungry. You will get to know your baby and your natural instincts as a mother will guide you. BFing is pretty full on but very rewarding and the BEST for your precious baby - be under no illusions though you will spend a huge amount of hours feeding in the first few months. You wont go loony if you occupy yourself by reading books, watching tv/movies, chatting on the phone and so on. You WILL feel so proud of yourself if you manage to hget past the first few months. Good luck!!

#24 Ianthe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:11 PM

You know not all breastfed babies feed like that. I say that because there may be people reading these threads that are completely put off breastfeeding by the thought of feeding so frequently and for such lengths of time. I did limit my babies time breastfeeding once breastfeeding was established at around 2-3 months. I wasn't militant about it but once they were gaining weight and were reasonably settled I would feed them for around 10-15 mins a side. If they fussed or were upset I would put them back on but often they had had enough. And I was very aware of growth spurts and would feed as much as possible at those times.

My last four babies were very efficient feeders though and big babies so I think that made a difference in them feeding quite well and not for great long periods of time. Some are more leisurely eaters.



#25 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:12 PM

QUOTE (~Starbuck~ @ 24/02/2011, 11:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Same. I want to do it so much but not sure I have the stamina by the sounds of it. I'm not going to pretend I'm a matyr but having a baby on my boob constantly sounds like a receipe for PND for me.
I'll give it a shot but its so daunting knowing I'm the one responsible for his food and comfort, DH can't do it and thats scary huh.gif


This is not the problem for me. I think I am just such an @nal person that I had an idea of how I thought it would all work out and it never happened. I don't think I armed myself with enough confidence and knowledge and I pretty much just got so overwhelmed by opinions of family etc.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.