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How often did/do you breastfeed your newborn baby?


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#26 Nobody Cool

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:13 PM

It sounds like hard work and at first it is hard work feeding around the clock while out of your mind with exhaustion but your baby will get much more efficient and feed times will be a lot faster after a little while. I genuinely found the first 6-8 weeks were the hardest then it all clicked into place and got much easier after that.

#27 bubinoven

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:13 PM

I fed on demand, which was on the odd occassion every half hour.  After around a week things settled into more of a two hourly routine, even over night.  By about 5 to 6wks night time went to four hourly sometimes up to six. and days were around every three hours and have been since (now nine months).

A really good book i found so easy to read and informative was Breast Feeders Anonymous, if you can get a copy/borrow a copy its great.

I also found looking up youtube and Dunstand Baby sounds handy, gives you the five different need sounds. Nah is the hungry sound.

And the suggestion of if in doubt whip em out......that is pure gold for advice.

#28 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:16 PM

How on earth does 1 stay alive with 1 hour intervals for feeding?

How do I know when my baby has had enough milk?

I feel like a failure already.

#29 Mamabear2010

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:19 PM

Sorry- one more thing. This might seem obvious but it came as a surprise to me. When I say I fed every 3 hours, it is three hours from the start of the feed, not the end of the feed. So if the feed takes an hour, you'll be feeding again 2 hours later.

#30 F.E.B.E

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:21 PM

DS was about 3 hourly. DD was a sleepy baby and I had to wake her up to feed during the day (could go 4 hours +). But at night she would cluster feed on and off for up to 5 hours, gradually reducing to a normal pre-bedtime feed when she was about 6 months old.

At first you can be feeding for up to 40 minutes a session but that time will generally become shorter and shorter.

#31 Nobody Cool

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:22 PM

A good thing to remember if you are totally wiped and need sleep that you can always express some milk and have a friend or relative feed your little one as well so you can catch up on some much needed rest.

And trust that your little one will take what he/she needs from you and that your body will match supply with demand. As longs as bubs is having regular wet nappies and a poo here or there it should be fine.

#32 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:24 PM

Thanks to all who have replied, for Starbuck and for me. It's not really easy asking for advice on something that you feel like you should know.

I am so worried that when the baby is born I will drop my bundle and not be in control. All of you ladies seem to be in control!!!

Edited by OneProudMum, 24 February 2011 - 10:24 PM.


#33 Mamabear2010

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:26 PM

Re your question about knowing if they've had enough...it's easy to stress about that because you really don't know how much they've drunk. But they usually pull off when they're finished. If they're still hungry, they'll cry. I also time every feed (even now) so I have a rough idea of whether it's a short or long feed.

If I think it's too short, I'll give him a break and try again in 5-10 mins.

Hth

#34 One Wish

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:28 PM

QUOTE (OneProudMum @ 24/02/2011, 11:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How on earth does 1 stay alive with 1 hour intervals for feeding?

How do I know when my baby has had enough milk?

I feel like a failure already.


Don't feel like a failure it's a very daunting experience.  The baby will tell you when it's had enough my dd always took herself off or fell asleep in the early days.

My dd also never fed every 2 hours in a 24 hour period she would feed every 3/4 hours in the morning until 1pm then go for every 2 hours until 10pm but would then sleep until 4am this only lasted a couple of weeks and then she only had 6 feeds in 24hours and from 3 months has only fed 4 and sometimes 5 times a day sleeping through the night from 8pm till 6am.

Just try and stay relaxed about it all, read as much as you can and enjoy breasfeeding your baby.  It took me a month or two to feel completly relaxed and now 8 months later I enjoy it (and I never thought I would)  Good luck


#35 lucky 2

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:29 PM

QUOTE (OneProudMum @ 24/02/2011, 11:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How on earth does 1 stay alive with 1 hour intervals for feeding?

How do I know when my baby has had enough milk?

I feel like a failure already.

1 hourly feeds often happened in the unsettled/cluster feeding period, if it was around the clock I'd be seeking help with bfing, 24 feeds a day is not the norm!

Baby has enough milk when over a 24 hour period, plenty of pale wee soaked nappies, under 2 months at least 2-3 soft yellow poos, bub sleeps after most feeds (not great in the fussy period), bubs eyes are shiny and bright, bub is active and alert when awake and bub wakes up naturally for feeds. That is a simple description of a well fed bub.

Failure, no, just a learner, experiential learner like all of us.

Please forgive me, I've not read all of the thread (off to bed, so tired but not like newborn bub tired!), but saw this post OP.
Seems a great idea telling us how you are feeling and thinking and I hope you get lots of support, all the best.

QUOTE
I am so worried that when the baby is born I will drop my bundle and not be in control. All of you ladies seem to be in control!!!

Probably because they have lived through it, have experienced it, have learned about themselves and their babies. Its not control, they are reaching out to you with compassion and probably all have dropped their bundle at some point to varying degrees.


#36 soapy

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:29 PM

Both were around about every three hours or when they were hungry.

How on earth does 1 stay alive with 1 hour intervals for feeding?

If you only have the one child you can sleep during the day. There is normally a few periods where they sleep for a few hours straight it just might not be at night.

How do I know when my baby has had enough milk?

Mine used to pull off or fall asleep. If they fell asleep too early I would tickle an ear or something and wake them but if it had been a good feed I would let them sleep.

I feel like a failure already.

Honestly please don't stress about it. I worried myself silly and then everything just fell into place. I only had pain from one nipple for a week or so and everything else was perfect. It takes the babies a little while to get used to sucking but the midwives are fantastic especially with first time mothers. If you do have trouble there is a lot of help out there (help lines and public lactation consultants).

#37 emc002

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:31 PM

This will be my first baby and I am 36.

I joined the ABA and went to a Breastfeeding course, and it was excellent.  A brave Mum even came in to tell us about her birth and breastfeeding experience.

#38 Mamabear2010

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:32 PM

Re being in control:
I stressed heaps when my ds was born. Breastfeeding was a learning curve. I was fortunate in that I didn't have any issues (attachment, cracked nipples, supply etc). Confidence comes with time & practice.

I think the most important things are:
Relax and feed somewhere comfy
Have something to entertain yourself with- tv, book etc
Focus on good attachment (v important)
Follow your babies cues (you'll learn them over time)
Drink lots of water.

#39 Cluckster

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:34 PM

Don't feel like a failure! Just being keen enough to ask is a good sign IMO.
I know it sounds cliched but trust your mothering instincts: they're rarely wrong. The well-meant assvice of sideliners on the other hand....

For me, my NBs fed anywhere from a 5hr gap to 20mins and for up to an hour at a time. It's such a long time! But it's amazing how quickly they learn to drain a breast rapid-time. For the first 8-ish weeks it was 45min - 1 hour, by 3 months it was more like 15min and by 6mo it was less than 10! Now that's express. original.gif

When my children cried, I picked them up for a cuddle. Sometimes they would immediately do that sideways mouthing thing they do when they smell breastmilk and I would simply assume that to mean they were hungry. If not, I considered the length and time of the last feed, checked whether they were wet/dirty, had wind etc and offered breast if all those things checked out.

Good luck!

#40 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:35 PM

QUOTE (Mamabear2010 @ 24/02/2011, 11:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Re being in control:
I stressed heaps when my ds was born. Breastfeeding was a learning curve. I was fortunate in that I didn't have any issues (attachment, cracked nipples, supply etc). Confidence comes with time & practice.

I think the most important things are:
Relax and feed somewhere comfy
Have something to entertain yourself with- tv, book etc
Focus on good attachment (v important)
Follow your babies cues (you'll learn them over time)
Drink lots of water.


Do you think considering my angst that it would be OK to ask people to leave the room whilst I am getting the hang of feeding? I'm hoping I don't get a huge amount of visitors at hospital anyway, but if I do I don't think I want an audience around if I can help it.

#41 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:37 PM

QUOTE (Cluckster @ 24/02/2011, 11:34 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Don't feel like a failure! Just being keen enough to ask is a good sign IMO.
I know it sounds cliched but trust your mothering instincts: they're rarely wrong. The well-meant assvice of sideliners on the other hand....

For me, my NBs fed anywhere from a 5hr gap to 20mins and for up to an hour at a time. It's such a long time! But it's amazing how quickly they learn to drain a breast rapid-time. For the first 8-ish weeks it was 45min - 1 hour, by 3 months it was more like 15min and by 6mo it was less than 10! Now that's express. original.gif

When my children cried, I picked them up for a cuddle. Sometimes they would immediately do that sideways mouthing thing they do when they smell breastmilk and I would simply assume that to mean they were hungry. If not, I considered the length and time of the last feed, checked whether they were wet/dirty, had wind etc and offered breast if all those things checked out.

Good luck!


My mum is probably the main culprit. Babies are to be breastfed every X amount of hours, nothing more and nothing less. You shouldn't over-indulge a baby etc. etc.
I never got to experience the feed/bond thing with DS and it's something I wish I had.

#42 lucky 2

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:37 PM

QUOTE (OneProudMum @ 24/02/2011, 11:16 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How on earth does 1 stay alive with 1 hour intervals for feeding?

How do I know when my baby has had enough milk?

I feel like a failure already.

1 hourly feeds often happened in the unsettled/cluster feeding period, if it was around the clock I'd be seeking help with bfing, 24 feeds a day is not the norm!

Baby has enough milk when over a 24 hour period, plenty of pale wee soaked nappies, under 2 months at least 2-3 soft yellow poos, bub sleeps after most feeds (not great in the fussy period), bubs eyes are shiny and bright, bub is active and alert when awake and bub wakes up naturally for feeds. That is a simple description of a well fed bub.

Failure, no, just a learner, experiential learner like all of us.

Please forgive me, I've not read all of the thread (off to bed, so tired but not like newborn bub tired!), but saw this post OP.
Seems a great idea telling us how you are feeling and thinking and I hope you get lots of support, all the best.

#43 Nobody Cool

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:39 PM

Yes! Do not feel afraid to kick people out at feed time. It was hard enough getting established without a room full of onlookers. My hospital required us to go down to the nursery for all feeds anyway, which was a good enough excuse for me to leave everyone back at the room to chat amongst themselves. Definitely insist on your privacy.

#44 libbylu

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:40 PM

About every 2.5 hours unless he was asleep. Never woke to feed. Just fed when he seemed hungry.

#45 Guest_ladidadida_*

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:40 PM

QUOTE (OneProudMum @ 24/02/2011, 11:03 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Wow this is going to sound so selfish and rude... but you mean to tell me that I will possibly have my breasts out for about 10 hours a day?


Yes. I used to joke with DH that he spent a full day at work but I spent the equivalent amount of time just feeding a baby.

#46 FormallyMe

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:43 PM

QUOTE (ladidadida @ 24/02/2011, 11:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Yes. I used to joke with DH that he spent a full day at work but I spent the equivalent amount of time just feeding a baby.


Bring it on I guess original.gif

#47 Guest_ladidadida_*

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:44 PM

QUOTE (~Starbuck~ @ 24/02/2011, 11:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Same. I want to do it so much but not sure I have the stamina by the sounds of it. I'm not going to pretend I'm a matyr but having a baby on my boob constantly sounds like a receipe for PND for me.
I'll give it a shot but its so daunting knowing I'm the one responsible for his food and comfort, DH can't do it and thats scary huh.gif


It gets quicker as they get older. In the beginning DS would take an hour per feed but by the time he was a few months old it was only about ten minutes. DD only ever took 10-20 minutes per feed from the beginning.

You could always express and get your DH to do a feed here and there for you too

#48 amberlee

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:47 PM

QUOTE
would be OK to ask people to leave the room whilst I am getting the hang of feeding?


Most definately!!! My first daughter was a nightmare to get attatched to the nipple. When I was in the hospital with her it would take up to an hour before she attached properly, she would fuss and carry on so much... we'd both be in tears.  And I'd end up naked on the top half as the midwives tried every technique to help me attach her.  

I've often visited friends in hospital with a new bub and been asked to wait outside the room as they are feeding, and of course that's not a problem.

And when I got home and we had visitors at feed time I would just excuse myself and go to the bedroom for privacy.  This was until both her and I finally got it sorted out... we became breastfeeding pro's and continued on for the next 18 months no problems at all, learning how to discreetly and efficiently feed in public.  

Good luck- you'll be fine!

#49 JinksNewton

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:49 PM

If your baby has no health issues (ie reflux) chances are that they will establish a routine for themselves. I used to demand feed with DS, except for us it was feed, sleep, play, as he almost always fell asleep while feeding.
He used to clusterfeed from about 6pm till 9 pm every night but then would go down for a 4 or 5 hour stretch. I would get a bottle of EBM or formula ready then go to bed. DH would stay up and do the midnight feed for DS then come to bed himself and I would wake up for the next feed. That way I would get a good solid stretch of about 5 or 6 hours, and then another 2 or so hours after the early morning feed.
This all happened after a few weeks. i would know when DS was hungry because if he was anywhere near my boobs he would start to shake his head around with his mouth open, looking for the nipple (kind of an obvious sign)
As for knowing if they are getting enough...if their head falls off the boob because they've gone to sleep, or they simply are staring into space with that glazed "milk coma" expression...if they're doing lots of wees and poos (we had a poo at every feed, pretty much)...if they seem pretty content, and are gaining weight...if you can see that their little tummies are rounding out after a feed...if your breasts start out full then get softer and softer as a feed progresses....then they are FINE
The week after we left hospital Owen only gained 60g and was still below his birth weight and I was distraught! The midwife said not to worry since he seemed happy enough and hydrated and to keep at it..the week after that he gained 500g
Good Luck! There are lots of people on here to help you if you have questions, and TBH, after those difficult first few weeks, for most people breast feeding settles into a lovely routine and gets much easier.

#50 Guest_ladidadida_*

Posted 24 February 2011 - 10:51 PM

If you join the ABA you get a free book - Breastfeeding...naturally. It has some great info in it. Could be worth doing.




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