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Why do you buy age-inappropriate stuff for your kids?


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#26 tenacious2

Posted 12 June 2011 - 02:58 AM

QUOTE
In a nutshell, mothers with the lowest level of formal schooling, income and access to economic and social choices, are in general the most likely to buy age-inappropriate stuff for their children, those mothers with the highest level of the former are the least likely.

I have heard something similar to this Colenso@fmguy.com, but I'm just trying to picture what Paris Hilton will dress her future daughter in... Social class and income does not always correlate with classy choices.

#27 Bam1

Posted 21 February 2015 - 06:52 AM

It's a no brainer age inappropriate clothes and toys are not appropriate but that's not going to debated here as already you have people tying clothes to prostitutes and thinking clothes make children provocative.

Im sick of reading how people want to make children responsible for others actions even when wearing appropriate clothing for a child, they may just show too much leg for the adult to handle or gasp show a shoulder.

#28 Bam1

Posted 21 February 2015 - 06:58 AM

View PostColenso, on 12 June 2011 - 01:41 AM, said:

The reported comments by author and social commentator Karen Brooks fail to identify the elephant in the room - the social class of the parents, particularly of the mother who is usually the parent most likely to buy clothing and footwear for their young children.

Australians are unaware of the relevance of social class in such matters, or feel uncomfortable talking about it, so tend to skirt around such issues for fear of being thought a snob.  This outlook is reflected in the language used by the authors of Australian studies. Likewise, US studies also do not usually refer explicitly to social class, preferring instead to identify more tangible factors such as income levels, highest year of education etc.  UK studies, however, where social class has been often explicitly recognised as the outcome of a complex mix of many more tangible factors such as income levels, highest year of education etc, tend to tiptoe less around the identifier of social class.

In a nutshell, mothers with the lowest level of formal schooling, income and access to economic and social choices, are in general the most likely to buy age-inappropriate stuff for their children, those mothers with the highest level of the former are the least likely.

I think Australians understand this perfectly that's why most love threads like this and the ridicule threads in the baby name forum. It allows them to ridicule those "lower" then themselves and have an air of superiority. Where else can you call other children names, bogan, sleazy, prostitute, provocative and think you are better.

#29 Sixx

Posted 21 February 2015 - 07:36 AM

I buy clothing for my sons and daughter carefully. Minors untill adults should look beautiful, cute, smart, pretty, stunning etc etc in their clothing it should cover their private parts properly -both genders !!!

Sorry just realised your question said why,
Because it makes me comfortable seeing my children presented nicely and be able to play comfortably I have so many times seen silly made swimmers etc for boys and girls that don't cover their parts and I don't get it.

Edited by Fivebubs, 21 February 2015 - 07:38 AM.


#30 Mpjp is feral

Posted 21 February 2015 - 07:41 AM

View PostFivebubs, on 21 February 2015 - 07:36 AM, said:

I buy clothing for my sons and daughter carefully. Minors untill adults should look beautiful, cute, smart, pretty, stunning etc etc in their clothing it should cover their private parts properly -both genders !!!

Sorry just realised your question said why,
Because it makes me comfortable seeing my children presented nicely and be able to play comfortably I have so many times seen silly made swimmers etc for boys and girls that don't cover their parts and I don't get it.

Just goes to show how 'inappropriate' is in the eyes if the beholder. I don't think my kids clothes should make them look beautiful and stunning, I think the clothes should be functional, comfortable, and be something they enjoy wearing.

But we do both agree that 'private parts' should be covered!!!!!

#31 Sixx

Posted 21 February 2015 - 08:01 AM

View PostMpjp is feral, on 21 February 2015 - 07:41 AM, said:



Just goes to show how 'inappropriate' is in the eyes if the beholder. I don't think my kids clothes should make them look beautiful and stunning, I think the clothes should be functional, comfortable, and be something they enjoy wearing.

But we do both agree that 'private parts' should be covered!!!!!

Well gee I wasn't intending to be superficial when I used the description words beautiful stunning etc I was trying to use words that come to mind to describe presentation (when their private parts are covered) I didn't want to take my post in an ill direction to describe when they are dressed in things you can see their private parts

#32 **Xena**

Posted 21 February 2015 - 08:13 AM

Who decides what's inappropriate though? There are some things which I think a vast majority would define as inappropriate. However there are plenty of clothes/toys that wouldn't bother some parents but would others. It's not that the parents allowing it are succumbing to peer pressure etc- they just have different lines of what is appropriate vs inappropriate.

#33 protart roflcoptor

Posted 21 February 2015 - 08:14 AM

View PostFivebubs, on 21 February 2015 - 07:36 AM, said:

I buy clothing for my sons and daughter carefully. Minors untill adults should look beautiful, cute, smart, pretty, stunning etc etc in their clothing it should cover their private parts properly -both genders !!!

Sorry just realised your question said why,
Because it makes me comfortable seeing my children presented nicely and be able to play comfortably I have so many times seen silly made swimmers etc for boys and girls that don't cover their parts and I don't get it.

No. Children DO NOT have to look  beautiful or pretty or cute or stunning.

Old thread is old.

#34 a letter to Elise.

Posted 21 February 2015 - 08:29 AM

I know this is an old thread, but I really haven't see that many "tarty" clothes for young girls around. Where are they all? I have see a few crop tops, which I'm not super keen on, but that's about it.

Maybe I am a bit indifferent to the short shorts that are around because I grew up in the eighties. Everyone wore short shorts then, including men!

I probably object more to the casual violence inherent in so many boys clothes and toys, and how repulsed so many people seem to be when it comes to boys doing or wearing anything remotely feminine.

#35 JustBeige

Posted 21 February 2015 - 08:44 AM

The thread was bumped by a spammer that I removed.

At this stage I think the topic can remain open as its still as relevant today as it was back then (unfortunately)

I will leave it up to  Amber if she wants to close it (or Admin)

Cheers
JB :)

#36 Sixx

Posted 21 February 2015 - 09:22 AM

View Postprotart roflcoptor, on 21 February 2015 - 08:14 AM, said:



No. Children DO NOT have to look  beautiful or pretty or cute or stunning.

Old thread is old.


Warning*** Sensitive

If you read my response I didn't mean they HAVE to look beautiful etc ......
I was trying to focus on positive discriptive words instead  of using other foul words to discribe AS WE ARE talking about MINORS here !!!
I was not trying to be superficial or painting a picture of the requirements of a child to look a certain way "beautiful" wow!.
My post focused on my negative view of clothing when you can see a child's private parts that's it ! trying to be tasteful, and sensitive towards MYSELF who had been inappropriately exposed and touched as a minor.

I don't understand the waiting to read responses going through them with a fine comb picking one word out and  quoting it over and missing the whole or main point that the person is making can even share a similar view to you anyway.
Posting things and walking on egg shells not because you've said something racist,ridiculous, abusive or unfair because you used a silly word? Ok then

#37 Squeekums The Elf

Posted 21 February 2015 - 09:28 AM

2011?

Arrrrgh the zombies have begun their uprising

#38 Bam1

Posted 21 February 2015 - 10:11 AM

View PostMrs Zee, on 21 February 2015 - 07:26 AM, said:

It's rather out of character for you to bump such an old thread :shrug:

Honestly I'd like to see the back of this thread, I wouldn't have posted if I'd realised that it was a zombie thread! Thanks spammer!!

I don't see the point in reviving any old threads, and certainly not these sort so this will be my last post.

#39 Lunafreya

Posted 21 February 2015 - 10:12 AM

I honestly wonder if this is a chicken and egg thing. As far as I know, adult-like childrens clothes have existed for a while and no one was too worried about them. On episodes of The Brady Bunch you see Marcia, Jan and Cindy wearing miniskirts, mini dresses and very short Baby doll dresses and nighties.

Another thing I can think of is the descriptions of the girls in the Baby Sitters club books. They were teens/pre-teens and some of the things they wore would be considered inappropriate.

I remember when is as young me and my sisters had mini skirts, daisy duke shorts, tops that showed off my midriff and as far as I was aware there were never comments about how he clothes were inappropriate or sexual. We also had high heels, make up etc and sexuality wasn't an issue.

It's something that adults have introduced to the argument. Chidren usually don't have those sorts of thoughts at young ages. And it's really upsetting these days we look at children with how a pedophile might look at them.

#40 wallofdodo

Posted 28 August 2015 - 03:45 PM

^^ Cheeky not even writing your own post. Stealing someone elses.

What do you call a thread that has been revived twice?

pS there was a spam post before mine... its been deleted

Edited by wallofdodo, 28 August 2015 - 04:24 PM.


#41 seayork2002

Posted 28 August 2015 - 04:15 PM

I can't say I have ever felt the need, maybe it is because I have a boy but he lived in shorts, trousers & tracksuit pants and basic tops.

I do have two preferences though - no guns (either toys on on clothes - except water pistols) and no skull and cross bones.

Growing up my brother and sister and I were not into labels/brands etc. my sister is more into fashion than me but none of us are designer label people.

And we all think bibs like 'hung like my daddy' and pole dancing kits for kids, also in the UK there is a catalogue store that had playboy labelled items for kids are all crass and revolting.

My husband and I have basic tastes and our son seems to have inherited this - as long as he gets to play he doesn't care what he wears.

I have noticed a heap more stuff like that in the UK then I have ever seen here though,

#42 PhillipaCrawford

Posted 28 August 2015 - 05:04 PM

My salvation came when I learnt to feel proud of shopping in OP Shops. I visit the Savers stores in Melbourne. Gorgeous girls clothes, easy to avoid the prostitute clothes and get some barely worn designer original for a pittance.

#43 PeninsulaGirl

Posted 28 August 2015 - 08:37 PM

View PostColenso, on 12 June 2011 - 01:41 AM, said:

The reported comments by author and social commentator Karen Brooks fail to identify the elephant in the room - the social class of the parents, particularly of the mother who is usually the parent most likely to buy clothing and footwear for their young children.

Australians are unaware of the relevance of social class in such matters, or feel uncomfortable talking about it, so tend to skirt around such issues for fear of being thought a snob.  This outlook is reflected in the language used by the authors of Australian studies. Likewise, US studies also do not usually refer explicitly to social class, preferring instead to identify more tangible factors such as income levels, highest year of education etc.  UK studies, however, where social class has been often explicitly recognised as the outcome of a complex mix of many more tangible factors such as income levels, highest year of education etc, tend to tiptoe less around the identifier of social class.

In a nutshell, mothers with the lowest level of formal schooling, income and access to economic and social choices, are in general the most likely to buy age-inappropriate stuff for their children, those mothers with the highest level of the former are the least likely.

Yep, this. Exactly this. The unpalatable truth is its to do with income and education. They shape life experience and therefore expectations and preferences/tastes.

And no, I simply don't buy it. My kids are dressed very nicely and fashionably, and not particularly expensively. But most definitely as children. When they question what other kids have I just explain different people do different things. We watch very little commercial TV, and when we do its recorded so we can forward through the ads. I also make a point of explaining the motives behind ads to my kids. They are switching on to them very quickly. I also very rarely taken them shopping for toys or clothes, and when I do they're only taken to outlets that are appropriate for them and their helped with their decisions.

So far so good!

#44 PeninsulaGirl

Posted 28 August 2015 - 08:42 PM

Oops just realised this was an old thread brought back to life.... Sorry folks

#45 JustBeige

Posted 29 August 2015 - 07:18 PM

**  WARNING.  THREAD FROM 2011 **


However,  I think the discussion is still relevant today.


I also think its interesting to see how / if,  people perceptions have changed since back then.


Just be aware that not everyone that contributed to this thread back then is still around.


I will flag it for Amber to review :)

Cheers
JB

#46 Therese

Posted 29 August 2015 - 08:05 PM

Hi,

We have no reason to close this thread so will let it continue (hopefully without the spammers ;)) Old threads can still discuss current issues.

Thanks,

Therese




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