Jump to content

Crate Training
Links on how to crate train your dog or puppy


  • Please log in to reply
65 replies to this topic

#51 Taff

Posted 24 October 2016 - 12:56 PM

Hi,
I'm hoping someone could advise me. I'm about to purchase a soft crate for inside the house,, but I do not know what size would be the most appropriate for our dog .

I have a GS that is crossed with a cattle dog (don't know how large she'll grow as she is still a pup - but she looks as if she;s all GS at the moment and can't see any cattle dog in her at all - so I'm going on a  average GS height)

Is the height of 68cm  too low for a GS? ( not worried about width and length - as all the xxxL soft crates seem to be around 101 long and around 68 /69 wide)

The other choice that I have , there is one seller selling an 81 high ,which seems very big to me and  I'm not sure I want to go that high if I don't need to. All the other sellers  that I'm coming across are selling xxxl ones at 68 high.
anyone got a GS or a large dog like a Rottweiler - is 68cm too low a height?
Thanks for any help

#52 Mollycoddle

Posted 24 October 2016 - 01:34 PM

Quote

Our circumstances are about to change and there is the potential that they may be crated for 8 hours. I may be able to drop home for 10 minutes over lunch to take them out to the toilet and for a stretch, but this would be pushing things.

I think this is cruel - 8 hours per day plus all night is ridiculous.  If you don't have space for a dog to have freedom then why have dogs - it wouldn't be that different to being in a tiny cell at the pound (another one who saw this show up in Active Topics).

#53 *Spikey*

Posted 24 October 2016 - 09:20 PM

Ah Mollycoddle, that post was from 2013, you're three years too late to that party.

Taff, that should be okay. GSDS are about 60cm at shoulder, so the additional 8cm wo Lad give enough head room.

#54 Taff

Posted 25 October 2016 - 01:26 PM

Thanks Spikey
I'm off to buy one now, whether she'll chew it is another matter, but they are cheap enough online. It's just for a bed/hidey hole for her
Kind Regards
edited for spelling

Edited by Taff, 25 October 2016 - 01:28 PM.


#55 rubelicious

Posted 20 March 2017 - 10:53 AM

Best thing we have done for our lab puppy is crate training...or as we like to call it his 'den'.

#56 kadoodle

Posted 12 January 2019 - 04:24 PM

Apparently puppies can unzip a soft crate. Did anyone else know this? I didn’t until half an hour ago.

#57 *Spikey*

Posted 12 January 2019 - 07:49 PM

Lol, it doesn't surprise me - you have two collies. Too smart by half.

#58 *Spikey*

Posted 12 January 2019 - 07:50 PM

For the record, I have wire crates, with 'soft furnishing' for a reason - that lovable Labrador was just too clever to trust with something as easy as a soft crate.

#59 Bottom

Posted 12 January 2019 - 08:19 PM

So cruel.

#60 Bottom

Posted 12 January 2019 - 08:20 PM

If you feel it necessary to put a dog in a cage then don’t get a dog.

#61 Bottom

Posted 12 January 2019 - 08:24 PM

View Postlittle bird, on 28 November 2013 - 12:00 PM, said:

Hello fellow craters! We have two staffies, a boy (2) and a girl (3). They absolutely love their crates and run to them when they hear us rumbling in their biscuit tin, or when we say 'in your bed'. Within minutes, they are snoring their faces off. When we get home from being out, there are no signs of distress and they are generally still all curled up and exit the crate to then climb back on the couch and sleep some more.

We exercise them heaps, with one or sometimes two big walks a day. We also have toys in the backyard to play with and play hide and seek inside for mental stimulation. They are also trained to run on a treadmill if the weather isn't suitable for outdoor walks. (They love this so much!) They are very well exercised and loved to pieces.

I guess my question relates to a potential change of circumstances. Until now, we have managed to work our schedules with jobs so that the most time they ever spend in the crate is around 5 hours. Our circumstances are about to change and there is the potential that they may be crated for 8 hours. I may be able to drop home for 10 minutes over lunch to take them out to the toilet and for a stretch, but this would be pushing things.

How long do you comfortably crate for, or would feel comfortable crating for based on the situation above? They would be walked before work in the morning and their toileting routine generally sees them go straight after breakfast or on waking. I guess we are just struggling with the idea of the increase in hours, even though they do appear to love being in there, and have each other for company during the day with their crates being placed next to each other.

What are your thoughts? Massive thanks!
thoughts? You are incredibly cruel.

#62 Bottom

Posted 12 January 2019 - 08:28 PM

View PostFeralRebelWClaws, on 27 August 2011 - 10:36 PM, said:

<!--quoteo(post=13655918:date=27/08/2011, 12&#58;12 PM:name=joy07)--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (joy07 &#064; 27/08/2011, 12&#58;12 PM) <a href="index.php?act=findpost&amp;pid=13655918"><{POST_SNAPBACK}></a></div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->Why do you train your dogs to be kept in crates?  What are the reasonings behind this and the benefits?<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->
r
I started to crate train for a few reasons
1. toilet training... we weren't sure with Bandit how he'd go being in overnight, so being confined in the crate encourages them to hold it because they don't want to pee in the bed
2. restrict their movement in the night, but have them feel they are still with us (the crates are in our bedroom)
3. Give them a place of their own
4. Give the cats some space (Elly follows the cats around otherwise, so she would sleep at all if not in a crate.)

I continue to crate them because they love their crates, it's their safe place <img src="style_emoticons/default/original.gif" style="vertical-align:middle" emoid=":)" border="0" alt="original.gif" /> We have issues getting them out of their crates on weekends! When Elly is told no or gets in trouble for something, she gets in her crate (she is a real people pleasing dog.)
LOL the place of their own is your home - it is theirs too. Not a cage in the home.

#63 kadoodle

Posted 12 January 2019 - 09:28 PM

View PostBottom, on 12 January 2019 - 08:28 PM, said:

LOL the place of their own is your home - it is theirs too. Not a cage in the home.

My kids sleep in their beds. Is that cruel, too?

#64 *Spikey*

Posted 12 January 2019 - 10:28 PM

Lol, a bottom speaking out of its a*se.....


Research, evidenced based stuff as opposed to your anthropomorphism, shows that crates are the equivalent of a den, and provide valuable safe zones for dogs who live closely with their families.

It is possible to use a crate cruelly, just like you can abuse the use of collars, leads, lack of food and shelter, not providing appropriate escape proof fencing, failing to train your dog, allowing your kid to be all over your dog, and so on. But do please, share your expertise..... in what way is a crate "cruel"? And I expect you to fully define and reference your claims.

#65 *Spikey*

Posted 12 January 2019 - 10:29 PM

View Postkadoodle, on 12 January 2019 - 09:28 PM, said:



My kids sleep in their beds. Is that cruel, too?

Apparently. They should be allowed to run wild and free - and be forced to sleep in the great outdoors in all weather.

#66 kadoodle

Posted 12 January 2019 - 10:49 PM

View Post*Spikey*, on 12 January 2019 - 10:29 PM, said:



Apparently. They should be allowed to run wild and free - and be forced to sleep in the great outdoors in all weather.

TBH, they don’t need much encouragement to go lord of the flies on me.

My sister didn’t crate her puppy - it slept in a big fluffy thing beside her bed - but she had hard floors and didn’t worry about nocturnal puddles. The soft crate is one that I bought to put my youngest son in when I had to check my bees and couldn’t get babysitting. I wrongly assumed that if it could hold a toddler, it could hold a puppy.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

 
 
Advertisement
 

Top 5 Viewed Articles

 
Advertisement
 
 
 
Advertisement
 
 
Essential Baby and Essential Kids is the place to find parenting information and parenting support relating to conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids, maternity, family budgeting, family travel, nutrition and wellbeing, family entertainment, kids entertainment, tips for the family home, child-friendly recipes and parenting. Try our pregnancy due date calculator to determine your due date, or our ovulation calculator to predict ovulation and your fertile period. Our pregnancy week by week guide shows your baby's stages of development. Access our very active mum's discussion groups in the Essential Baby forums or the Essential Kids forums to talk to mums about conception, pregnancy, birth, babies, toddlers, kids and parenting lifestyle. Essential Baby also offers a baby names database of more than 22,000 baby names, popular baby names, boys' names, girls' names and baby names advice in our baby names forum. Essential Kids features a range of free printable worksheets for kids from preschool years through to primary school years. For the latest baby clothes, maternity clothes, maternity accessories, toddler products, kids toys and kids clothing, breastfeeding and other parenting resources, check out Essential Baby and Essential Kids.