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Am I endangering my chances of healthy baby by going public?


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#1 2_shoes

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:00 PM

I've been killing myself thinking whether I should go private or public. I live in Manly and the choice of OBs is either Manly or City or Lower North Shore. Anyone I have enquired about will cost me at least $5000 out of pocket. That's before any other costs in the Private hospital.

To be honest, I want to save the money and go public. But this is where my dillemma (and GUILT) lies. We could afford it. $6000-7000 of potential costs won't break us, although the money would come handy after the baby comes. I am also the main income winner and the maternity leave will hit us considerably. But nothing too dramatic financially.

Personally, I don't care whether I have a private room or what the food is like in a hospital and I am demanding enough to ensure people help me, if it comes to it. My biggest source of guilt, and worry if the baby has higher chances of being born healthy in private care?

Am I being stupid by being economical at the most cruicial time? Is the baby better off in one-on-one OB care and at a top private hospital?

That's the only thing I am concerned about, I am terrified of regretting my choice later.

What are the statistics? Does private care have better baby outcomes? Please help!!!

Edited by Oceans, 16 June 2011 - 08:01 PM.


#2 waawa17

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:17 PM

You can't compare statistics directly, because private care deals with a relatively wealthy, well-nourished, healthy, low drug-using, low-risk population, and turfs very high risk situations to public care. Those in the obstetric industry have made headlines by claiming that outcomes are better in private care, but they've failed to take these very basics into account.

What you can be sure of is that your chances of interventions and surgery are much, much higher in private care. How much that factors into your decision is up to you.

#3 livvie7586

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:21 PM

i don't know any statistics, but both of mine were born in a town where there is no such thing as delivering a baby privately.  everything is done through the public system.  if a baby or mother needed a higher level of care (normally taken care of by midwives) they get it.  i don't think i'd ever go private

#4 Mamabug

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:21 PM

I've had three high risk pgs with perfectly healthy babies through the public system.

If you have "problems" during your pg, you will be refered to an ob/high risk clinic from the midwife clinic.

My first was induced due to, among other things (!) placental deterioration. They had a flood of deliveries the day I was booked in and chose not to deliver her that day as they wanted a dedicated midwife for her and a dr who wasn't flat out. We were very closely monitored until the induction and was fine.

All part of the public hospital package!

#5 Natbub0610

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:25 PM

I think it also depends on how your pregnancy goes.

I had text book pregnancies for my dds and I went public thru birth centre but I know a friend who had issues and although it was a struggle to pay OB, it was peace of mind and consistency of care with 1 dr.

If you do have issues or problems, they will still look after you in the public system, if there is anything major, you will still be looked after.

Check with hospital, if a problem does arise, can you change to private? I think it's only a dilema if you books as private, you can't change back to public.

Edited by Natbub0610, 16 June 2011 - 08:47 PM.


#6 Mum2MarNell

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:25 PM

I went public with my first two and will be doing the same with this one.
I don't know about in Sydney, but down here in Hobart, if you have chosen a private hospital and then have complications in your labour they transfer you to the public hospital.
You could probably arrange a tour of the maternity section of the local public hospital and see what you think?
I really think that as far as the medical side of things goes they have a duty of care to provide the same level - so the things that are probably different are the food and rooms.
Best of luck deciding.

#7 jules77

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:26 PM

QUOTE (waawa17 @ 16/06/2011, 08:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
What you can be sure of is that your chances of interventions and surgery are much, much higher in private care. How much that factors into your decision is up to you.


That is, unless you find yourself a private Ob like mine who believes in 'leaving women to be' in labour and therefore has a very low intervention rate  wink.gif

He is somewhat of a rarity in his approach from what I gather though.

In terms of private vs public, I wanted to reassurance of an Ob on call during my first pregnancy,as I didn't know how I or my body would deal with the whole situation. The public hospitals I could have gone to didn't really appeal to me (one very large and busy, the other has a 24 hr stay policy), which was another deciding factor.

That said, I don't think you can directly compare the care between public and private care. There are so many variables to take into consideration.

Maybe go with private first time around, as I think that is what your head is telling you to do.


#8 Guest_BeachedAsBro_*

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:26 PM

Both systems are good for delivering babies and delivering good health care. I'm an RN who works in both systems and am delivering in the private simply because I choose to.

You can be a private patient in a public hospital. Actually the public system encourages this and the fees are usually much lower than in a private hospital. Check with your public hospital Obstetricians about the Gap. When I've been admitted to a public hospital as a private patient (not pregnancy related) I had a single room (although this is not guaranteed) choice of specialist, my husband got a parking pass for the car park, I had free TV and aside from the nice things, I was there in the system with excellent doctors. I've never had to pay a cent to stay in the public hospital as the health insurance completely covers it.

Check with your insurer also.

Edit to clarify- NSW health loves when patients elect to use their insurance as they don't actually have to then use their budget to cover the cost of the care provided, the insurer does original.gif

Edited by BeachedAsBro, 16 June 2011 - 08:27 PM.


#9 L&E

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:29 PM

Think....if you are going to a tertiary hospital, that is where the private hospital would transfer you too if there were a problem anyway!! They have the NICU's right where you are, giving baby everything they need for their best chance (if needed-hopefully it's an area you never have to see!)

I have full PHI but like you I preferred to spend my money to buy me time off work after baby was born, and went public with both babies. I went through a Birth Centre attached to a tertiary hospital and I could not fault the experiences, even when the birth was not going to plan.

#10 JupitersMoon

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:31 PM

Geez you will have plenty of mother guilt already when you have the baby, I think you can let the guilt on this one go..

I went public and was very well looked after, developed high BP towards the end and was regularly monitored, etc. The only reason i would ever go private is for a private room, but I would probably only stay one night so who'd pay $5k for that?!

Also the way I see it, if you go private you have one ob = 1 opinion, one way of doing things. Whereas if you go public, you will see multiple obs, midwives, etc and get a range of opinions, ideas, tips, etc.

#11 SJ2571

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:32 PM

I went private with my first baby he was born at Mona Vale Hospital. Yes I had my doctor at the delivery, private room with it's own bathroom.

But with my second baby I went public at the same Hospital.  I had the same Midwife and Doctor from my first delivery there.  I was placed in a share room but I was the only one in the room.

Also both pregnancies where high risk as well.  Not much difference really except I didn't have to pay the big dollars for the second birth.

#12 lozoodle

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:33 PM

Don't be ridiculous, public is fine! In fact, they have some of the best facilities for babies born early or those requiring special care.

I went public with both of mine, by choice, and loved it.

#13 Anne of The Island

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:33 PM

I lived near Manly when I had my 2 babies and delivered them both at the RNSH (public) on the midwivery support program.  I was so happy with the care I received there and never once worried about being less likely to deliver a healthy baby in the public systemt.

You'll find that most of the OBs in the private system also work shifts in the public system.  If your baby was to have problems it would more than likely be transferred to a public hospital anyway as private hospitals rarley (if ever) have Neonatal Intensive Care Units.

Good luck with whatever you decide and congratulations on your pregnancy.

#14 Vesper79

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:33 PM

I had no idea there was a risk at all by going public. Most of the big public hospitals employ the best doctors in the country. Public hospitals care in my experience are perfectly fine. I had my baby in Mater in QLD and found the level of care and quality of doctors and midwifes fantastic. Even the food was great. Why waste your money paying for something that is free? Private hospitals are just businesses after all, and will charge you like a wounded bull - even panadol will cost you!

#15 2_shoes

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:34 PM

QUOTE (BeachedAsBro @ 16/06/2011, 08:26 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You can be a private patient in a public hospital. Actually the public system encourages this and the fees are usually much lower than in a private hospital. C


"BeachedAsBro", if I went private in public, let's say RNSH, would the anaethetician/assistant surgeon fees be no gap? Or will I receive accounts from all attending doctors just like in a private hospital?

#16 Tessied

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:35 PM

Look at it this way, do you think those of us who all went public were 'endangering' our babies?

No.

Save your worries for the important stuff.

#17 senimili

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:37 PM

With my first we went private, had the same OB who didn't make the birth. Total waste. I didn't get private room either.

Next two I went public in two other states and received exceptional care at the birthing part. DS was born in Alice Springs public and they are considered one of the best in this area because of the number of complicated pregnancies they see.

Because I am a high risk, I have always got one-on-one care with OB in public system and think you get better care during pregnancy by the regular midwife checkups than a rude OB.

Never did I think I was endangering my baby's health. I was in extremely capable hands.

#18 *BellBird*

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:38 PM

I can't help with the statistics but I do know that the midwife led care I had through the public hospital you are considering was great and gave me a much lower chance of intervention than if I had chosen to go privately. I was really happy with the midwives and doctors there and will choose to have a 2nd one there if/when there is one!!

PS - I had my baby there a year ago and saw the same midwife for all my appointments all the way through.

#19 Wut??

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:39 PM

I am yet to be convinced that private OB care in Australia is a financially sensible decision.   Still, it's your money, your kid.

I think anyone who thinks you're 'endangering' your child for going one way or the other is a little OTT.

Edited by Srsly??, 16 June 2011 - 08:41 PM.


#20 *maddierose*

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:40 PM

QUOTE
You'll be fine in public OP. The doctors all have medical degrees and the hospitals have the same equipment. Whether you have a healthy baby or not is mostly up to you and genetics rather than a doctor or hospital.


This. My sil is a private ob and just by the way she talks of how birth should be is enough to make me go public.

I have had 4 fantastic public births. I'd much rather pay a private midwife than an ob.

#21 slpdad

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:41 PM

QUOTE (waawa17 @ 16/06/2011, 08:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You can't compare statistics directly, because private care deals with a relatively wealthy, well-nourished, healthy, low drug-using, low-risk population, and turfs very high risk situations to public care. Those in the obstetric industry have made headlines by claiming that outcomes are better in private care, but they've failed to take these very basics into account.

What you can be sure of is that your chances of interventions and surgery are much, much higher in private care. How much that factors into your decision is up to you.


yup. if the poop hits the fan you will wind up in a public hospital. it's great for their metrics, sucks for everyone who has to pay for everything twice. fortunately the chances of anything untoward happening is pretty small. if it's a matter of a room to yourself or something like that, definitely go private.

#22 MadamFrou-Frou

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:43 PM

QUOTE
.if you are going to a tertiary hospital, that is where the private hospital would transfer you too if there were a problem anyway!! They have the NICU's right where you are, giving baby everything they need for their best chance (if needed-hopefully it's an area you never have to see!)

I have full PHI but like you I preferred to spend my money to buy me time off work after baby was born, and went public with both babies. I went through a Birth Centre attached to a tertiary hospital and I could not fault the experiences, even when the birth was not going to plan.


Word for word what I would have written original.gif Two healthy babies going public, I only paid for parking.

You can compare stats for NSW hospitals here:
http://www.mybirth.com.au/birth-stats/prov....php?selstate=0

What exactly are you worried might happen in a public hospital?

#23 2_shoes

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:46 PM

QUOTE (Tessied @ 16/06/2011, 08:35 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Look at it this way, do you think those of us who all went public were 'endangering' our babies?

No.

Save your worries for the important stuff.


Sorry, I did not mean it this way at all. I am just confused, since personally we could afford the fees but I don't want to pay unless I really have to. I'd prefer to spend it on a family holiday in the future, which might be better for everyone's mental and physical health.
I guess my biggest worry also is that my local hospital is Manly. Without knowing if I am high risk or not yet (8 wks) I suspect this is where I will have to go. They don't have doctors there 24/7, neither do they have infant ICU or 24/7 operating theater. So that's like going to a private hospital minus your own OB...

Does anyone know if there is any way at all to get into RNSH? I would feel safer if I had an option to go to a big teaching hospital...

#24 stelley

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:49 PM

4 babies delivered at Manly. Great midwives. Great stay.
Nike.
Wouldn't take the risk having to cross the Spit in peak hour or when the bridge is up -there's at lest 3 stories/year in the MD about deliveries on the side of the road at the Spit.

#25 MadamFrou-Frou

Posted 16 June 2011 - 08:52 PM

You could ask your GP to refer you to RNSH, I don't know if they take out of area bookings.
Also look at the policies and facilities of each hospital. Are you assigned one midwife or a team? (Continuity of care provider is a good thing). is a birth centre available? Do they encourage active births? Can you birth in a bath, if you wish?

I went through birth centres at RPA and RWH and never had to wait in an overcrowded waiting room.

Edited by MadamFrou-Frou, 16 June 2011 - 08:53 PM.





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