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leaving baby overnight in nursery to bottlefeed


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#26 liveworkplay

Posted 05 July 2011 - 06:29 PM

Only one out of the three private hospitals I have birthed in had a well baby nursery. It is certainly not encouraged to have your baby taken away due to bonding and establishing feeding. Feeding your baby to initiate bonding and body healing after labour is as important as BF imo.

I had to fight for them to NOT take my baby after my c/s. I had her crib right near my bed with my bed up high and did not have a problem reaching her. I didnt co-sleep the first night due to all the drugs I had in surgery but did on subsequent nights.

Edited by liveworkplay, 05 July 2011 - 06:31 PM.


#27 Lyric

Posted 05 July 2011 - 06:31 PM

I can't imagine allowing anyone to take my newborn baby away during those first days.  Four hours sleep in a row actually seems pretty reasonable to me anyway.  I don't think it is part of the midwives' job to look after babies when their mothers and/or fathers are capable of doing so.  They are there to support labouring and birthing women and assist with post natal care.

Organise some support for yourself to allow you to care for your baby in your room.  A post-natal doula would be a good start.  Milk can take longer to come in after a caesarian - up to five days is pretty normal - and it is the baby sucking which stimulates the milk supply.  Babies are born with good reserves and there are plenty of ways to get formula into them without using a bottle if it is really necessary before your milk comes in.  Call a lactation consultant or the ABA.



#28 emily09

Posted 05 July 2011 - 06:31 PM

Its your baby, You feed it, weather it be by breast or bottle! I can't believe you would even expect a midwife to look after YOUR baby. I have had 2 c-section and had my baby with me the whole time I was in Hospital. If you find it hard get your DH to stay with you. Midwifes are busy doing thier, you should be busy doing yours, which is looking after your baby!

#29 2FairyGirls

Posted 05 July 2011 - 06:35 PM

I am a real bfing nazi and my 2 girls never touched formula.  For various reasons the baby boy needed to take formula before my milk came in ( and it always comes late for me..by day 8 ish). For the first time ever I gave my baby to the nursery for 8 hours in a row and Slept slept slept after an exhausting and traumatic 3 day labor. I also dd it for 1 night at hoe with my dh. It was absolutely the best thing I could have done.  I still feed the baby from my boob pretty much continuously the remaining 16 hours of the day but those 2 nights sleeps were completely invaluable.  I had a baby friendly hospital but I agree with the pp that in this situation I felt " looked after " as much as my baby was. Once my milk came in on day 8 I never touched a bottle or drop of formula again so certainly it was not the big evil that it is made out to be. In addition I had a settled and calm baby which was a big change for that first week from number 1 and 2 !!

To the mums that are commenting that the op needs to suck it up, give it a break . We are not all superhuman and our needs do not need to be ignored once baby arrives.

Edited by 2FairyGirls, 05 July 2011 - 06:40 PM.


#30 JAPN

Posted 05 July 2011 - 06:42 PM

QUOTE (Blondiebear @ 05/07/2011, 05:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Perhaps I'm wrong but I thought the purpose of a hospital was to support the health of the mother and baby, not babysit? Surely a newborn baby trying to adjust to life outside the womb deserves to be near its mother if at all possible, breastfeeding or not we are not 'dumped' with the baby, if we choose to have a baby we should be prepared to care for it!

Health of the mother can and does include allowing her to rest enough to be able to cope.

I don't think there is anything wrong with getting one night of sleep. Often pregnancy can mean a real lack of sleep right up to the end and add an exhausting labour and this can mean the mother just has nothing left in the tank.

Supporting the health of mother IS supporting the baby.

#31 Blondiebear

Posted 05 July 2011 - 06:50 PM

QUOTE (JAPN @ 05/07/2011, 06:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Health of the mother can and does include allowing her to rest enough to be able to cope.

I don't think there is anything wrong with getting one night of sleep. Often pregnancy can mean a real lack of sleep right up to the end and add an exhausting labour and this can mean the mother just has nothing left in the tank.

Supporting the health of mother IS supporting the baby.

That's why I said "if at all possible", I understand there may be circumstances where the mother does need extra help and rest. I don't think it should be an automatic expectation of hospitals and midwives.

#32 lucky 2

Posted 05 July 2011 - 06:54 PM

Right after a C/S birth the staff know what to do (I did anyway huh.gif).
If no one else is there to teach baby care then the staff will need to change nappies and hand bub to mum after positioning mum for a bf.
It's not rocket science.
Human mammals indicate a need  for feeding on a regular basis (it is normal and called survival).
Usually they are sleepy in the first 24 hours (unless they are in pain ? from a hard labour or birth) and then wake up with very frequent callings in the second day of life onwards.
Especially they are unsettled at night.
That is what healthy normal human mammals do.
If you don't want to have help (which I hope you get, it should be routine) to bf and wish to bottle feed formula at night then that would be interrupting the normal physiological process that are (usually) hard-wired into the infant.
But, this is your choice of course.
MW's have to help with your baby if you are incapacitated but this is usually only for a short time after a uncomplicated C/S.
Sometimes women haemorrhage after birth or have dangerously high blood pressures and may require specialist care in a high dependency unit separated from bub.
In this case if you are well enough (and consent, can't say I've met a mother yet who has refused to see her baby in those circumstances) then bub is either brought to you for a feed or staff can express some milk for you to give to bub.
If possible bub will only get your milk unless there is a problem with low blood sugar in the bub (ie mum is a diabetic), then they may need to give formula (with parental consent) but can give it by a cup (preferentially) or a bottle if bub is unable to drink from a cup (not that common).

I'd suggest you get in contact with your hospital and talk about what happened last time and work out a plan for this time.
All the best.

ETA, Separating bub and mum is one of the basic ways to throw off balance the relationship between baby and breasts and this is the basis of successful feeding.
There are ways to manage unavoidable separations and if you choose to be separated but there will be consequences for the "breast feeding team" (compiled of 2 humans, one mother and one baby).
One of the greatest obstructions to successfully feeding a baby in the biologically normal way is that we (ourselves) and many staff don't see the mother and the bfing baby as a unit, as"one" so to speak and as nature intended.
Ideally we stay together and are nurtured and supported to stay together.
But again, if you don't wish to do it this way then you need to speak up and prepare.

#33 JinksNewton

Posted 05 July 2011 - 07:18 PM

My hospital took DS for a few hours on Night 3 after he had the "feeding frenzy" on Night 2 and I broke down in front of a midwife. They were having a fairly quiet couple of days and didn't mind doing it. That being said, they didn't really have a nursery, just an area to put the babies in that were under lights for jaundice. For babies that weren't under lights they would simply hold the baby to their chest while they did paperwork.

DS also had a small FF on Night 3(with my permission). After that DS went to sleep and DH sat up in a chair all night with DS on his chest so I could get a few hours sleep  wub.gif

The day after that my milk came in, and I really think having that sleep helped. I noticed in the months after that that whenever my sleep deprivation got particularly bad, my supply dropped.

I don't really give a stuff if that was best practice or not, all I know is that we went home with a BF routine established, great bonding and with me having had some sleep.

QUOTE
If you find it hard get your DH to stay with you. Midwifes are busy doing thier, you should be busy doing yours, which is looking after your baby!


Charming. What if you don't have a DH? What if you can't feed? Easy to see how PND can get started sometimes.

#34 MadamFrou-Frou

Posted 05 July 2011 - 07:28 PM

I think it's unfair and dangerous that mums who've experienced a c-section are left alone with a newborn when they can often barely pick the baby up.  But then, rooming in is important for bonding and to encourage the milk to come in. The crying at night is actually designed to help bring the milk in.

If you don't have a family member or partner who can stay with you and hand you the baby when needed then I think it's worth asking what the policy is at your hospital. I had a very long labour with DS and was a wreck afterwards, the nurses could see that I was very weak and took the baby for a few hours overnight for the first 2 nights, they didn't feed him though. Babies don't need anything more than a small amount of colostrum in the first few days. Mine didn't come in until day 5 the first time either.

#35 kemisz

Posted 05 July 2011 - 07:35 PM

I get an almost claustrophobic feeling thinking about being stuck at night with a newborn after my experience with my firstborn.

And I didn't even have a C/S!

Sure, bonding is wonderful and midwives are already busy - but how much bonding is really happening when your sobbing your eyes out with cracked nipples and a screaming baby whilst going for 26th hour of no sleep?

#36 JAPN

Posted 05 July 2011 - 07:40 PM

QUOTE (Blondiebear @ 05/07/2011, 06:50 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
That's why I said "if at all possible", I understand there may be circumstances where the mother does need extra help and rest. I don't think it should be an automatic expectation of hospitals and midwives.

Actually I thought your comments about 'dumping' the baby and 'babysitting' were unnecessarily harsh.

The OP is asking because she had a very bad experience last time.

I think the expectation of midwives and nursing staff is to help the mother recover from birth as much as possible so she CAN mother.

#37 Soontobegran

Posted 05 July 2011 - 07:57 PM

QUOTE (Bigmess @ 05/07/2011, 05:17 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
hi
has anyone had any experience with leaving baby ON in the nursery to bottlefeed so they can get some sleep after birth?

I've seen scenes in some hospitals where the mother wants the midwives to take the baby overnight so she can sleep and they basically say NO.

My milk basically NEVER came in and it was quite a horror movie for me to be woken up at 3am from my 4 hour sleep, to be left with a screaming newborn, to be left for over an hour several times where I couldn;t reach her due to my ceserean.

I am trying to devise a plan to avoid this disaster again; I'm wondering if it is indeed allowed to say to the midwife, look can you guys take her for the night from 10pm to 5am and bottlefeed her if she needs it??

The other option would be for me to hire a nurse/nanny and ask her to do this. I figure that would be a lot cheaper than going to a private hospital


I don't know where you delivered your baby but in my experience a mother who has had a C/S or is extremely sore after a difficult vaginal delivery are given plenty of help to manage the baby until they feel better HOWEVER it is not encouraged to separate the mums and babies by putting the baby in the nursery over night.
Most hospitals these days have signed the 'Baby Friendly'initiative which means we are not permitted to offer a breast fed baby formula unless it is ordered by the paediatrician. This is WHO recommended and is actually what most women want.
Most hospitals do not have a 'night nursery' for well babies either as they simply do not have the staff to care for the babies . I wouldn't be happy sending a baby out to a nursery knowing that it may only get minimal observation while the midwives are either busy in delivery suite or assisiting other mothers with feeds etc.


QUOTE (jen42 @ 05/07/2011, 05:49 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
However if you do not intend to BF then there is no reason you need to be woken up to feed, lots of women can't and/or dont't BF at all and they aren't dumped with the baby for an hour overnight just because it's policy

'Dumped with the baby" ohmy.gif
Sorry but are you insinuating that mothers who formula feed do not need to bond with them as much as breast fed babies?
If you read my post above, midwives are not there to feed well babies overnight---having said that there are times when mum is unwell or extremely tired there may be an offer to give one feed over night but this depends very much on the staffing of the hospital.


QUOTE (Blondiebear @ 05/07/2011, 05:55 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Perhaps I'm wrong but I thought the purpose of a hospital was to support the health of the mother and baby, not babysit? Surely a newborn baby trying to adjust to life outside the womb deserves to be near its mother if at all possible, breastfeeding or not we are not 'dumped' with the baby, if we choose to have a baby we should be prepared to care for it!

^^this.


OP, if you wish to have your baby fed overnight you need to ensure you do not attend a hospital which is designated 'Baby Friendly' as you will find it almost impossible to have an entire night of sleep courtesy of the staff however I know I have spent hour after hour with some women sitting on their bed trying to help her breast feed and you need to let the staff know when you need help. Press the bell and don't be afraid to. If you don't we will presume you are managing OK sad.gif
Night duty is usually extremely busy. If the ward is post natal only there are often 2-3 staff for 30 + women and babies---the midwives will do the very best they can and I know that sometimes that isn't good enough when they are forced to spread themselves very thinly across the patients.

It is somewhat confusing I must say---we are damned if we do and damned if we don't. We try to promote a healthy mother/baby relationship and successful breast feeding as this is a general expectation of the wider population yet there are people saying it is not 'mother friendly' to encourage her to feed her baby?


#38 Soontobegran

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:00 PM

QUOTE (JAPN @ 05/07/2011, 07:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Actually I thought your comments about 'dumping' the baby and 'babysitting' were unnecessarily harsh.


I don't believe Blondiebear was the person who mentioned 'dumping the baby' huh.gif

#39 JAPN

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:07 PM

Edited to say - my bad. It was Jen42 that mentioned 'dumping'. However, I still think the comment about babysitting unwarranted as originally mentioned.

Yes, the comment Jen42 made about dumping was not helpful at all.


Edited by JAPN, 05 July 2011 - 08:24 PM.


#40 Cranky Old Woman

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:18 PM

Are Blondiebear and jen42 the same person?

#41 thirties

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:21 PM

My DD1 spent her first night in the hospital nursery as I had a severe allergic reaction to the morphine given to me during the c/section.  I was physically unable to care for her and have no recollection of the birth or the first 24hours after it.  To this day, I still hate the thought that her first night in this world was spent without her mum at her side even though there was nothing I could have done to change that situation.

I would chat to the hospital nurses about your first experience and use that buzzer whenever you need it.  Think about having DH or a friend stay with you that night or just be on call to come in if you need it.  You can't get that first precious night back when it's gone.

#42 JAPN

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:28 PM

QUOTE (thirties @ 05/07/2011, 08:21 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You can't get that first precious night back when it's gone.

You're assuming that everyone feels the same way you do. You had a certain experience and hence you feel a certain way. OP had a different experience and feels she will probably need the rest. Neither position is 'wrong' or 'right'.

#43 Soontobegran

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:30 PM

QUOTE (JAPN @ 05/07/2011, 08:07 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Edited to say - my bad. It was Jen42 that mentioned 'dumping'. However, I still think the comment about babysitting unwarranted as originally mentioned.


Unfortunately we may be splitting hairs here because what else is it when you have some one else look after your baby all night?

There used to be Mothercraft nurses--in fact St V's Private still has a couple. If you were lucky enough to have a MC nurse on your shift then their job description included caring for and feeding babies. Since the change to demand feeding and 'Baby Friendly' hospitals they have effectively been fazed out as most mothers do not wish their babies to be anywhere but beside them. sad.gif
They still get help with feeding when they room in if it is needed.
EFS

Edited by soontobegran, 05 July 2011 - 08:31 PM.


#44 StopTheGoats

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:31 PM

.

Edited by OldMajor, 10 August 2011 - 01:46 PM.


#45 Roobear

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:34 PM

My hospital didn't have a night nursery... in fact the midwives came by every so often to take my bp, feel my tummy and take DD's temp but that was it. I presume if you want help with b/f or anything else you have to ask? I wasn't offered it. I was offered a bath demonstration on Day 2 but I declined and just did it myself. I was in a private room with a shared bathroom so I had to shut the door when I went to the loo and I would take DD into the bathroom with me in case anyone stole her while I did a wee laughing2.gif At the time this possible scenario seemed very real to me! So I would have probably had an anxiety attack if I had to leave in the night nursery lol.

I think there should be extra support for women who are having a difficult recovery... I am sure you could ask for it? Or maybe if you are choosing a hospital you can ask for their policy on it?

Edited by Roobear, 05 July 2011 - 08:36 PM.


#46 JAPN

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:40 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 05/07/2011, 08:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Unfortunately we may be splitting hairs here because what else is it when you have some one else look after your baby all night?

As I said, its not a helpful comment. The OP feels she needs the rest and I can well understand it.

Many mothers do want and need the rest after labour. Many women are already exhausted prior to labour even starting.

As to whether or not women would have liked a night to fully recover is a moot point - because policies are often determined without their input or consultation. The BF parliamentary enquiry was proof of that - many groups were consulted but the average women had no idea it was happening.

Unfortunately there appears to be a pendulum and as always it swings too far one way or the other.

Edited by JAPN, 05 July 2011 - 08:41 PM.


#47 newkie

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:48 PM

When I had DS2 (who is baby number 4), a midwife offered to take him for the night! She said it was a one time deal because I'd just had my c-section and he was formula fed only not breast fed, so she was happy to have him til morning.

The only problem was, I couldn't sleep! I dozed for maybe an hour between 8pm and 3am when I finally asked for him back, as soon as he was in my arms, I fell straight to sleep with him in bed with me.

I guess what I'm saying is, next time for you might be completely different. You know what you are doing now, and roughly what to expect, and you may not feel like you need that break after all.

#48 L&E

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:55 PM

They had to take DS2 to have a blood test about 30 minutes after he was born. I couldn't go, my midwife was busy sorting me out and checking me for tears. I made my DH go with him with strict instructions to not take his eyes off him.

So no, I wouldn't let my newborn stay in the nursery overnight unless there was a pretty serious scenario happening. I agree that having DH with me the whole hospital stay (all 18 hours of it!) helped immensely as there was always support or someone to hold bubby, get a midwife etc. Perhaps see if your partner can stay?

#49 Soontobegran

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:56 PM

QUOTE (JAPN @ 05/07/2011, 08:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As I said, its not a helpful comment. The OP feels she needs the rest and I can well understand it.

Many mothers do want and need the rest after labour. Many women are already exhausted prior to labour even starting.

As to whether or not women would have liked a night to fully recover is a moot point - because policies are often determined without their input or consultation. The BF parliamentary enquiry was proof of that - many groups were consulted but the average women had no idea it was happening.

Unfortunately there appears to be a pendulum and as always it swings too far one way or the other.



With respect JAPN, I do understand that women need rest---I'm a mother too.
The reason the 'Baby Friendly' initiative was developed because MOST mothers DIDN'T want to be separated from their babies nor did they want their babies having formula given to them as it drastically effected their milk coming in and establishment of lactation.
You say the pendulum has swung too far, I don't agree. The majority of mothers are still happy with the Baby Friendly status of their hospital.

You will find that despite the encouragement to room in and breast feed on demand if the mother is unwell or extremely tired there will be someone who will find the time to give their baby some EBM for a feed overnight.
Midwives generally do have a heart unfortunately they don't often have the time. sad.gif

#50 kissy10

Posted 05 July 2011 - 08:59 PM

Please talk to the hospital prior to the birth to see what options they offer.

When DS2 was born he required care in the SCN due to IGUR. I was on various BP meds due to having PE in the pregnancy & I was relieved I was able to recover from the C/S & get my BP down without having a newborn to deal with all the time. I honestly believe it helped me avoid a repeat of PND & made the second time around wonderful.

Edited by kissy10, 05 July 2011 - 09:01 PM.





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