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leaving baby overnight in nursery to bottlefeed


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#51 ~*~vicki~*~

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:09 PM

Gosh I would have given anything to actually be able to have my child by my bedside post birth! With my 2nd I didn't even get to hold her until she was 96hrs old. Instead of seeing it as an inconvenience and a chance to catch up on your sleep see it as a wonderful bonding time with your baby

#52 ~*~vicki~*~

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:13 PM

Actually another thing, I had my DD2 in a small private hospital where a lot of the mothers sent their babies to the nursery overnight.

I stayed by my babes side while she was in SCN and I watched midwives (in the room next door) try and juggle babies all night, thing is they only have 1 set of hands so chances are your baby will be left to cry at some point because they just can't attend to every baby immediately so I guess you have to really have to wonder whether a distressed newborn is really worth a bit of rest...

#53 MuppetGirl

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:21 PM

The hospitals I stayed in usually do not take babies to the nursery overnight as they don't want to/are unable to spare a staff member to supervise.

However after my DS was born I was not in a good place which was of course made worse by not having any sleep for close to 3 days so a lovely midwife took him for 5 - 6 hours overnight to get me to try to sleep.

I don't think it is something they can guarantee you they can do (as if they have lots of women come in in labour they need all hands on deck, or if it is a partically hectic night!) but I am sure if there really was a need for it and you can get a midwife on shift that is happy to do it, you should be able to request it.

#54 2_shoes

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:23 PM

If bonding process is so fragile one is left wondering HOW ON EARTH surrogate or adopted children get any love at all?

Two decades of living together post-birth are bound to encourage some bonding.

#55 Soontobegran

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:27 PM

QUOTE (Oceans @ 05/07/2011, 09:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If bonding process is so fragile one is left wondering HOW ON EARTH surrogate or adopted children get any love at all?

Two decades of living together post-birth are bound to encourage some bonding.


How insightful? huh.gif


#56 Speshelle

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:28 PM

The hospital I was in offered to take baby during the night, especially as it was quiet. We held onto her though

#57 Expelliarmus

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:39 PM

When I was taken to HDU after #3 the baby could not come with me due to the fact the midwives in there could not care for the baby and *I* was the priority and baby went to SCN because there is no nursery in Adelaide WCH.

So you may find that it's not just a policy but simply that there isn't actually a nursery to take them to.

The private hospital I had the older two in did have such a space but I admit I did get very annoyed when they insisted #1 *go* there. I was p*ssed off about it actually they kept trying to put the baby in there for no good reason. Some of those midwives were nasty though ...

#58 MadamFrou-Frou

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:40 PM

Studies have shown rooming in to have all kinds of benefits for babies and mothers which are not just related to breastfeeding. These include reduced weight loss, reduced rates of jaundice, better temperature regulation and less crying.

here are some interesting links.

http://www.kemh.health.wa.gov.au/brochures...wnhs0175_m2.pdf
http://www.healtheast.org/maternity/rooming-in.html
http://www.askdrsears.com/topics/pregnancy...vs-nursery-care
http://books.google.com.au/books?id=eX3aVS...ies&f=false

All that said mums need supporting too, so don't be afraid to ask for help.

#59 Guest_~Aine~_*

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:44 PM

I'm a huge advocate of rooming in, however after my 1st birth, where some dolt of a learner anaethsetist punctured my back around 8 times before announcing she "just couldn't get it" I simply could not move.  There was a nursery, but we were encouraged to use rooming in.  I was in the same situation that I couldn't move to pick up my baby so just buzzed any time I needed help and someone came in and handed him to me.

They also took care of nappy changes and so on for the first 12 hours or so.

You need to find out what options are available, but chances are it may well not be as traumatic for you as the first time, so you may end up preferring to have baby with you anyway.



#60 Charli73

Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:55 PM

My private hospital took DS to the nursery for one night after I hadnt slept in 3 days prior to and due to the birth and i wasnt in a good state after emergency CS. I was a new woman after a good nights rest...

my milk didnt come in until day 10 though as after that night DS got a temperature and then spent the next 5 nights in the SCN being pumped full of antibiotics, great way to inhibit bonding there. I had to express colostrum and bring it to the nursery every 4hrs...

#61 -enjay-

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:00 PM

QUOTE
Regular breastfeeding or expressing will also help your milk to come in

Yes, and by not feeding overnight the first night you will delay the onset even more I would have thought.

Edited by -enjay-, 05 July 2011 - 10:01 PM.


#62 peppersmum

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:06 PM

QUOTE (Oceans @ 05/07/2011, 09:23 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
If bonding process is so fragile one is left wondering HOW ON EARTH surrogate or adopted children get any love at all?

Two decades of living together post-birth are bound to encourage some bonding.


Not a great example, there are many studies on adopted children that show attachment/bonding issues from being separated from their parents.  I won't say missing a feed in the middle of the night in the first 24 hours is going to lead to a life of attachment/bonding issues, but those first few weeks are very important and the natural oxytocin levels peak right after birth and then go down slowly after that, so it's the optimal time for mother and baby to be together for bonding and the establishment of a good breastfeeding relationship (if the OP is planning to give breastfeeding another go).



#63 SCARFACE CLAW

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:09 PM

I chose not to breastfeed my second at all, and my local private hospital took DS overnight every night. I'd just take him to the nursery at night when I was ready for bed and they'd bring him back at 8am. The sleep was delicious! And no bonding issues here  original.gif

#64 Lifesgood

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:12 PM

The private hospital I had DS in there were definitely babies in the nursery overnight who were being bottlefed by the midwives. So it is possible OP, you might just have to find out from your hospital if they will do it.

When I had DD (at a different private hospital) I was taken to theatre at around 11pm after I delivered her as the placenta wouldn't come out naturally. As I was out of action for quite a while the midwives asked for my consent to formula feed DD just until I was back on board. They kept DD in the nursery that night and brought her into me at 6am.

Anyway OP, yes I think it probably is do-able, make a few phone calls about what the various hospitals will do.

#65 Emm27

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:12 PM

QUOTE (~Sorceress~ @ 05/07/2011, 03:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Oh dear! Not a Baby Friendly Hospital, I'm guessing! sad.gif

Actually I'd beg to differ.  I have nothing but praise for our hospital - having both our children there has been a wonderful experience.  Perhaps encourage is not the correct word from my OP - we were offered the use of the nursery and the decision was left up to us.  Like I said, we used it a few times over the week we were there - I know there were some women that used it every night and others that didn't use it at all.  I couldn't care less what other people choose to do, we based our decision on what was right for us as a family.

As for midwives having other duties - the one night I took DD there at 3am, there were a row of sleeping babies, and 6 midwives cuddling babies who were awake - hardly the scene of horror.   rolleyes.gif   There was always plenty of staff around at all times.

I would consider a hospital that leaves a baby screaming because a mother is unable to reach it after a c-section neither BABY or mother friendly hospital.




#66 Guest_loulou_b_*

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:21 PM

QUOTE
Its your baby, You feed it, weather it be by breast or bottle! I can't believe you would even expect a midwife to look after YOUR baby. I have had 2 c-section and had my baby with me the whole time I was in Hospital. If you find it hard get your DH to stay with you. Midwifes are busy doing thier, you should be busy doing yours, which is looking after your baby!


QUOTE
Perhaps I'm wrong but I thought the purpose of a hospital was to support the health of the mother and baby, not babysit? Surely a newborn baby trying to adjust to life outside the womb deserves to be near its mother if at all possible, breastfeeding or not we are not 'dumped' with the baby, if we choose to have a baby we should be prepared to care for it!


I think these comments are very unhelpful, OP please ignore them and do not feel guilty.  

At the moment you are probably scared stiff about a repeat of your last experience.    I don’t think leaving the baby overnight is a good option but I can see how you would be drawn to this as a solution. My advice is to talk to the hospital staff before you go in if you can, or have someone close to you talk to them when you get there and explain what happened last time re: leaving you with the baby.  See if you can talk to the NUM and explain how worried you are.  If they know about it in advance maybe you can come up with some compromise?

QUOTE
to be left with a screaming newborn, to be left for over an hour several times where I couldn;t reach her due to my ceserean.


God, I totally empathise.

If you are anything like me it wasn't so much having to actually feed the baby or being woken up but the feeling of ABANDONMENT and POWERLESSNESS when you couldn't reach your baby and attend to its needs.

QUOTE
You will find that despite the encouragement to room in and breast feed on demand if the mother is unwell or extremely tired there will be someone who will find the time to give their baby some EBM for a feed overnight.
Midwives generally do have a heart unfortunately they don't often have the time.


Don’t count on it.
I had an emergency c/s and then a reaction to morphine (really bad itch all over).  I had DD in with me all night.   I was not asking for the child to be fed and sleep in the nursery all I wanted was to be able to get her out of the basinette (effects of epidural prevented this).  How is listening to my child scream while I can't reach her and then waiting 20 mins for assistance helping me to bond with my baby???????  This was in a major teaching hospital in Sydney (it has since been criticised for its care in other areas).

To the posters who made the above quotes, you assume that all care given in hospitals is equal .... it is NOT.  Unfortunately hospital resources and even personalities prevent mothers from receiving best practice care.  The extremely rude midwife I met that night told me that they were one person short and that we all had to be "patient" - same midwife told me they were too busy to get me some more Phenergan form pharmacy when the effects wore off at 3am ...... I tell you that was a horror night.

QUOTE
I was in the same situation that I couldn't move to pick up my baby so just buzzed any time I needed help and someone came in and handed him to me.


Yes this is how it should work but certainly doesn’t always…

Sorry that I have hijacked your thread OP.  I just want people to consider the individual circumstances.  I was very disillusioned after the birth of my daughter, the care (or lack of) led to PND.  If rooming in is done properly (with appropriate supports) it is a good thing.  If not, well they may as well have  left me out in the foyer.


#67 JAPN

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:27 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 05/07/2011, 08:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
With respect JAPN, I do understand that women need rest---I'm a mother too.
The reason the 'Baby Friendly' initiative was developed because MOST mothers DIDN'T want to be separated from their babies nor did they want their babies having formula given to them as it drastically effected their milk coming in and establishment of lactation.

With respect STBG, the BFHI was implemented as part of a WHO initiative to promote BF.

Is there any kind of review where women's opinions are sought on this issue?

#68 Soontobegran

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:36 PM




QUOTE (marnie27 @ 05/07/2011, 10:12 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
As for midwives having other duties - the one night I took DD there at 3am, there were a row of sleeping babies, and 6 midwives cuddling babies who were awake - hardly the scene of horror.   rolleyes.gif   There was always plenty of staff around at all times.


I have to know what hospital this was marnie? original.gif
6 midwives on a night shift with nothing to do except cuddle babies sounds like utopia to me.
Our public hospital has 2 midwives to 30 women and 30 babies in the post natal ward and the delivery suite has 4 staff with a couple of extra on call.
The private unit also had the same staff/ patient quota at night.

I have to wonder how the night supervisor didn't allocate some of those staff to help out elsewhere?

#69 Soontobegran

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:39 PM

QUOTE (JAPN @ 05/07/2011, 10:27 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
With respect STBG, the BFHI was implemented as part of a WHO initiative to promote BF.

Is there any kind of review where women's opinions are sought on this issue?



I know it was a WHO inititiative, I said that in a previous post. Our hospital did not just put their hand up to be a Baby Friendly hospital without at first seeking the opinions of it's patients and I am certain other hospitals would be the same.
It took 18 months between us thinking about it and actually being granted it and then initiating it!

Edited by soontobegran, 05 July 2011 - 10:40 PM.


#70 JAPN

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:42 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 05/07/2011, 10:39 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I know it was a WHO inititiative, I said that in a previous post. Our hospital did not just put their hand up to be a Baby Friendly hospital without at first seeking the opinions of it's patients and I am certain other hospitals would be the same.
It took 18 months between us thinking about it and actually being granted it and then initiating it!

You have missed the point of what I wrote.

Can you show where the average women in the street had input to the BFHI.

You stated MOST women wanted it. On what do you base this?

Is there something you can point me to that supports that going forward? In other words is there a feedback loop and how does that happen?

Ongoing, how does the BFHI know that its end users are happy with it?

The only measurement I can see relates to implementing the steps and BF rates. I cannot see mention of the women's input at all, hence the question.

Edited by JAPN, 05 July 2011 - 10:46 PM.


#71 mischiefmaker

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:45 PM

I don't believe the OP is serious.

#72 Soontobegran

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:52 PM

QUOTE (JAPN @ 05/07/2011, 10:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
You have missed the point of what I wrote.

Can you show where the average women in the street had input to the BFHI.

You stated MOST women wanted it. On what do you base this?

Is there something you can point me to that supports that going forward? In other words is there a feedback loop and how does that happen?

Ongoing, how does the BFHI know that its end users are happy with it?

The only measurement I can see relates to implementing the steps and BF rates. I cannot see mention of the women's input at all, hence the question.


I base it on the questionaire our hospital gave to all it's antenatal women JAPN!
You didn't read what I said!
The decision to be a BF hospital was made AFTER canvassing our patients and finding they were supportive of it.
Aside from that , I can assure you that from my experience the greater majority of women DO want their babies in their room with them 24/7.
ETA
How do we know women are happy with the BFI? Like most hospitals we give our patients a patient satisfaction form to fill out to do before they leave or once they get home and seeing as our patient satisfaction rates are a steady 98% with the BFI receiving the thumbs up we will not be stopping it.

Edited by soontobegran, 05 July 2011 - 10:55 PM.


#73 JAPN

Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:58 PM

QUOTE (soontobegran @ 05/07/2011, 10:52 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
How do we know women are happy with the BFI? Like most hospitals we give our patients a patient satisfaction form to fill out to do before they leave or once they get home and seeing as our patient satisfaction rates are a steady 98% with the BFI receiving the thumbs up we will not be stopping it.

Ok. Then what are the questions around the BFHI specifically? What hospital is it because I presume these are publicly available.

Also, this appears based around individual hospitals. I cannot see anywhere where the WHO or the BFHI in Australia which is a midwife based organisation, take feedback. Can you point in that direction?

#74 Expelliarmus

Posted 05 July 2011 - 11:00 PM

One would assume that the feedback collected by hospitals would inform the WHO and the BFHI.

#75 Honeymummy

Posted 05 July 2011 - 11:01 PM

I think you should be feeding your baby even if you are fortunate to have a nursery where theycan go for a while. The public hospital that I was in has gotten progressively tighter over the last three years with 3 babies I delivered there. There is no way in the world that the midwives would take my bubs even for 10mins. If you could get one to answer a call bell that would be a miracle! I think the Baby Friendly hospital is a load of crap designed to cut staff at hospitals despite it being a WHO initiative. The midwives at our local hospital get poached to other wards on quiet nights and there is absolutely no room to move. Even if you had a bad birth experience and no sleep for 2 days. Mind you my hospital wanted every one to go home in 4 hours after giving birth - and if you didnt - you were sorry to stay. It meant a 2am discharge for us after giving birth at 10pm - they though it was reasonable - I didnt!!




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