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Why are blueberries so expensive in Australia?


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#26 *LucyE*

Posted 21 November 2011 - 03:23 PM

QUOTE
When I have a garden I am going to try to grow them here but I expect it to be difficult, in a trade-off for being able to grow lemons.

Mine are planted on the western side of my citrus trees and they are all happy and doing well.

I find the biggest and best strawberries to be on new season runners. The older the plant, the smaller the berries. They need plenty of water at regular intervals and are hungry (not nitrogen rich stuff though). I use them as a ground cover for an ornamental bed and they seem happy enough under camellias. Mum gets  at least 1kg of fruit per plant off her strawberries each season. She plants fresh each year.

#27 **Tiger*Filly**

Posted 21 November 2011 - 03:35 PM

QUOTE
When Blueberry season is in full tilt, punnet price will drop to $3 a punnet.
I bought a punnet for $2.50 this morning. That's the first time I've seen them that cheap this year though, and the first time I have bought any this year - they were $6 last week! I usually buy the frozen ones and eat them frozen for dessert.

#28 maliwoo

Posted 21 November 2011 - 03:41 PM

cheapish blueberries = go to tasmania. They have a decent climate for blueberries and other berries,

#29 ThatsNotMyName

Posted 21 November 2011 - 04:02 PM

We're in Canberra & have a small blueberry bush still in a pot which gave us a decent (for the size of the bush) crop last year & looks as though it will again this year. Can't wait to get it in the ground when we finish landscaping, the poor thing won't know it's self. DS loves blueberries, I dislike them fresh but they're good in baking etc.

#30 Maple Leaf

Posted 21 November 2011 - 04:11 PM

I remember picking wild blueberries as a kid (avoiding the bears of course)...they tasted amazing. We would get buckets of them.

Yum.

The farmed ones just don't taste the same.


#31 Aqua Kitty Kat

Posted 21 November 2011 - 04:23 PM

QUOTE (Me n Marshmallow @ 21/11/2011, 01:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I get a 1 kg bag for $8.99 from coles. However they are imported.


I've never seen 1kg bags. Is this a Coles in NSW/Sydney?

#32 Kim

Posted 21 November 2011 - 05:33 PM

I'm in the Illawarra and we have 2 blueberry bushes that are thriving.

We are getting about a punnett a week off each so far, and there is loads of fruit still coming through.

They are in the bottom corner of the garden, which is quite a damp spot.

I had no idea they were hard to grow.

Oh and the fruit is divine, big fat juicy berries

Edited by Kim, 21 November 2011 - 05:34 PM.


#33 Jenflea

Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:21 PM

Ok, I'm going back to Bunnings to buy the ones I saw to see if I can grow them too!

#34 HRH Countrymel

Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:27 PM

Slightly off topic - but where my Mum comes from they are called 'Wurtleberries' - isn't that a fabulous name!

Mmmmmm...... wurtleberries.

#35 kadoodle

Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:35 PM

I've had no problem growing a blueberry bush in Victoria.  I do have a problem beating the kids to the fruit.

The previous tennants here planted a maple tree.  Poor thing looks so sad and homesick.

#36 papilio

Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:42 PM

Does anyone have a mulberry tree?  My Grandparents had one on a block of land which they have since sold.  I used to sit up the tree and eat them.  I bought a punnet of them recently and they were horrid tasteless lumps.

I also bought some loquats and they weren't as bad, but they are still a little fruit with a big seed!

#37 Mummy2RyanandAlex

Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:42 PM

QUOTE
cheapish blueberries = go to tasmania. They have a decent climate for blueberries and other berries,


I purchased 2 little punnets last week from coles, 2 for 7$ all eaten in less than 2 minutes.

I might look in to growing some.


#38 kadoodle

Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:50 PM

QUOTE (Astraea @ 21/11/2011, 09:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Does anyone have a mulberry tree?  My Grandparents had one on a block of land which they have since sold.  I used to sit up the tree and eat them.  I bought a punnet of them recently and they were horrid tasteless lumps.

I also bought some loquats and they weren't as bad, but they are still a little fruit with a big seed!


My parents just put a mulberry tree in.  What are they like?  All I know about mulberry trees, is that you go round them early in the morning.

#39 papilio

Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:53 PM

Haha!  The ones that I've met have been great for climbing.  They produce a really yummy berry, similar to a blackberry, I guess.  Not as many seeds as a raspberry.  They stain badly, but you just rub a green (unripe) mulberry on the stain and it should come off.

#40 Elemental

Posted 21 November 2011 - 08:59 PM

Have lived in a couple of places with mulberry trees - they grow quickly and fruit a lot during their season. There was a wild one on the verge of our old street that we used to fight the birds for.

I've never seen a blueberry bush before, but this thread inspired me to google!

#41 Smoo

Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:03 PM

QUOTE (Astraea @ 21/11/2011, 09:42 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Does anyone have a mulberry tree?  My Grandparents had one on a block of land which they have since sold.  I used to sit up the tree and eat them.  I bought a punnet of them recently and they were horrid tasteless lumps.


We have a dwarf one in western sydney... there was a lot of fruit but the birds beat us to them though, it's only in it's 2nd year, i'll have to net it next year.

I also have 3 blueberry bushes of the same age that have produced about 2 berries so far  sad.gif

#42 ez21

Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:05 PM

Blueberries (in Australia) seem a bit tasteless to me and are one of the highest pesticide residue foods you can buy.  Enjoy, in moderation.

#43 Guest_Telmatiaeos_*

Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:09 PM

We grow blueberries.  That are easy to grow but I can see why they are so expensive to buy.  Small, fiddly, fragile and they don't all ripen at once.  

We have a mulberry tree and a loquat tree but haven't yet had any fruit from them.  

Blueberries do really well in pots using an acidic potting mix like the one that you would use for camellias.  I use the pine needles from the Christmas tree as mulch once a year.  They help to acidifying the soil.

#44 matt1972

Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:11 PM

QUOTE (Me n Marshmallow @ 21/11/2011, 01:41 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I get a 1 kg bag for $8.99 from coles. However they are imported.


Thats what I would have thought would drive the price up here.
We pay "reasonable" wages to even our lowest paid workers in Australia. The same cant be said for North America and other regions.


#45 Guest_Telmatiaeos_*

Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:16 PM

QUOTE
Blueberries (in Australia) seem a bit tasteless to me and are one of the highest pesticide residue foods you can buy. Enjoy, in moderation.


Our homegrown ones are very tasty.  

Why do they have so many pesticides?  We grow organically and blueberries don't seem to get anything eating them.  Strawberries on the other hand...

#46 babybeli

Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:22 PM

We are growing blueberries but the birds have an eye for them to.  No sooner do I see one really close to being ready I go out the next day and its gone.  Picked from the tree by a pesky bird.  

Hopefully when the plant gets bigger I might get to some of them before they do.  I do love all the beautiful birds we get though so I guess its the price I pay.  But just for once I want to try a home grown blueberry and see how much better then the shop ones they are.

#47 I'm Batman

Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:28 PM

What I really want to know is why glitterberries that give people the groovy high are less popular.

I could go for some of those.

ok, jokes.

I think some of the price point has to do with the growing conditions. They prefer places like tassie, you may of noticed that tassie is at the bottom of the map and quite small, they allready grow peas and apples.

And they have two heads so Im assuming for every berry they put in the container there are two in the mouth.

Edited by BabyJaguar, 21 November 2011 - 09:30 PM.


#48 BeezMum

Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:28 PM

We go to a pick your own farm in country Vic during the high season (Feb) and it's about $12/kg? They are absolutely delicious and unlike any bought blueberry though

#49 nettik

Posted 21 November 2011 - 10:12 PM

QUOTE (BobOfKelpieness @ 21/11/2011, 12:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Conversely, it can be almost impossible to buy decent cheap mangoes in the UK. They're mostly weird tasteless varieties. And they don't come by the box.


hehehe... my husband was SURE he had discovered a new fruit when he moved to the UK - the texture of a twig in a pale yellow-ish colour, with very little taste - he was rather disappointed when I explained that it was in fact a mango…

#50 *LucyE*

Posted 21 November 2011 - 10:42 PM

QUOTE
Does anyone have a mulberry tree?

Yep and they are dead easy to grow. I have memories of climbing our old mulberry tree too and getting covered in stains.

I've got two 3 year old grafted varieties and they are big and bushy with next to no input from me. They are on the western side of my chook pen to give the chooks shade in summer. I haven't watered them since the first few weeks of planting but it was a wet summer last year. I assume the manure from the chook pen would be fertilizing them.

We've had fruit every year so far and this year's been so bountiful that even after birds and kids, there's still plenty on the tree.




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