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What do developing breasts look like?


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#1 Green Gummy Bear

Posted 02 April 2012 - 08:30 AM

Yes, I realise it's a stupid question, but I don't remember what they looked like when I started to develop.  DD has just turned 8.  She's tall and lanky but this morning I noticed that it looks like she's starting to develop in the breast area under below her nipples, not above though  I'm wondering if this means she's in the beginning stages of developing breasts?  She hasn't complained of any soreness or sensitivity.  She hasn't asked for crop tops or mentioned that her friends are wearing any, so not sure if I should offer?

#2 mks81

Posted 02 April 2012 - 08:40 AM

I would be interested in some replies as well. My just turned 9 year old might be developing as well but I'm not too sure as she has always been quite skinny and the last few months has manged to put on a bit of a tummy and I'm not sure whether it is just a bit of puppy fat around the nipples as well.

And frankly I thought I had a few more years cry1.gif

#3 sophiasmum

Posted 02 April 2012 - 11:59 AM

I have noticed my 8 & 1/2 yr old DD's body is changing in that area, and recently I have been shocked to see some of her classmates developing quite obviously in the chest area.

OP I wouldn't bother with crop tops until yours asks or until it becomes really obvious.

#4 mumto3princesses

Posted 02 April 2012 - 12:10 PM

I found this on breast development

But yeah, they start out as whats called breast buds usually right under the nipples. Poor DD3 was only just 7 when hers started developing. I actually took her to the Dr and was told that it's definately breast tissue. At least all her hormones are normal I guess. Some girls can be mean especially the young ones. Poor thing was so upset at a school disco a few weeks ago because she was wearing a dress (and more noticeable than the school uniform) and a couple of girls were teasing her. It's hard for her as even DD1, in Year 8 hasn't started yet.



#5 Amanda_R

Posted 02 April 2012 - 01:08 PM

QUOTE (sophiasmum @ 02/04/2012, 11:59 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
OP I wouldn't bother with crop tops until yours asks or until it becomes really obvious.

Just on that and the question of crop tops, I'd actually give them to her sooner rather than later, just so she gets used to wearing them as part of her normal wardrobe.  I only say this because my mother waited until it was obvious and by that time I never wanted to wear them (I was embarrassed).  Had she given them to me from the start, before I was really aware of why, then I'd probably have just accepted them (and probably been less embarrassed about my breasts in general at that age).

Of course not every child is the same, but for that reason I'd just give them to her to wear soon.

#6 butterflies

Posted 09 April 2012 - 10:01 PM

I have just only started to get used to DD#1 having little ones, now DD#2 looks like she is starting too  cry1.gif

I just tried to find a link to the crop tops that my DD likes best as they are really soft.

I got them from target in the girls section, they are bonds and bright colours.  Apparently they are really comfy and don't have a tight elastic bit at te bottom, kinda ahh bra material.





#7 mumto3princesses

Posted 10 April 2012 - 07:32 AM

DD1 & DD3 don't like the tight elastic bit either.

The ones I bought for them are really good but I haven't seen them lately. So, not sure if they have stopped making those ones or whether its just that I haven't seen them in our local store. They are bonds and stripes across in 2 shades of pink or an aqua colour. They are so soft and stretchy. I got them from Target.

#8 butterflies

Posted 10 April 2012 - 09:57 AM

mumto3princesses they are the same ones that DD#1 likes




#9 PatG

Posted 10 April 2012 - 10:09 AM

I'm pretty sure I started to develop at around 11.5 (perhaps a late bloomer!) but didn't use any  crop tops until I was 13 - I think my Mum thought I should have some at that stage as I was having regular doctor's appointments where I had to take my shirt off. I don't actually remember being embarrassed at all but I guess as I developed later than most of the other girls in my grade I was picked on for not having breasts rather than having them.  I remember  a costume for a school play which was bikini top like and being asked "did you have to stuff the top?" by some mean girl.  Anyway, I figure if your daughter has started developing then find some of the crop tops and she can choose to wear them or not (it might depend what she is wearing over - e.g. yes for sports uniform, not for everyday uniform.

PS  I also recall making some mental note about my very early development so I would remember when I first noticed so that if it was something bad (e.g breast lumps/cancer) then I would be able to tell a doctor when it started.  Obviously I was a self absorbed drama queen!  But perhaps talk to your daughter and let her know that what is happening to her is the real deal, not something odd.

#10 Sares83

Posted 10 April 2012 - 10:09 AM

google "tanner stages"

#11 Adamf

Posted 05 April 2014 - 10:52 PM

As a single father with 2 young daughters how am I supposed to about buying them their first bra

#12 lynneyours

Posted 05 April 2014 - 11:08 PM

^ Do they have an aunt or young grandmother who could take them shopping?

If not, you'll need to explain how their body will change and what will happen - you might need a book etc to help you.  
Many stores will measure you for a bra, so if the girls are happy with that, then that will help.

Or just go to somewhere like Target or Myer and select a few small, plain styles and get them to help each other try them on to see what fits.

Or you might have the kind of relationship that they're happy for you to help.

#13 aprilrainatxmas

Posted 05 April 2014 - 11:28 PM

View PostAdamf, on 05 April 2014 - 10:52 PM, said:

As a single father with 2 young daughters how am I supposed to about buying them their first bra

I'd ask her best friends mum to take them to Target etc together, hand over some money and let the girls pick what they want.

I also think if you talk about some things early enough it is less embarrassing. I think it's your attitude that counts.

I think too, that Dads in general have a huge responsibility and that their children don't hear them make sexist or derogatory comments about any women's breasts.

They'll be fine.

My mum tells me it was her MOTHER that ignored that she needed a bra. It was if she pretended they weren't there they'd go away!

#14 *Beeker*

Posted 05 April 2014 - 11:46 PM

My DD (turned 11 in Jan) started budding at around 7, I whisked her off to the paed who assured me it was very normal these days to see signs of puberty in girls as young as my DD. Fast forward 4 years & she has only just started developing. I was convinced I would have a 9 y.o with periods but so far nothing....hers have come up & gone down several times over the years so in some cases it can be slow going.

Edited by *Beeker*, 05 April 2014 - 11:47 PM.


#15 CantBeBothered

Posted 06 April 2014 - 05:59 AM

My DD recently turned 9 and has started to develop breast buds. I initially thought she may have put on a bit of weight in that area. But then I read somewhere that puppy fat would feel soft whereas breast buds will be firm and a little sore to touch. So I asked my DD and she confirmed that hers were firm and sore. I was shocked at it starting so early! I am hoping the other changes hold off for a few more years.

#16 CantBeBothered

Posted 06 April 2014 - 06:00 AM

Oh and OP - I also read that signs of puberty after the age of 8 are normal and nothing to worry about.

#17 Ireckon

Posted 06 April 2014 - 07:36 AM

View PostAmanda_R, on 02 April 2012 - 01:08 PM, said:

<!--quoteo(post=14452151:date=02/04/2012, 11&#58;59 AM:name=sophiasmum)--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE (sophiasmum &#064; 02/04/2012, 11&#58;59 AM) <a href="index.php?act=findpost&amp;pid=14452151"><{POST_SNAPBACK}></a></div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->OP I wouldn't bother with crop tops until yours asks or until it becomes really obvious.<!--QuoteEnd--></div><!--QuoteEEnd-->
Just on that and the question of crop tops, I'd actually give them to her sooner rather than later, just so she gets used to wearing them as part of her normal wardrobe.  I only say this because my mother waited until it was obvious and by that time I never wanted to wear them (I was embarrassed).  Had she given them to me from the start, before I was really aware of <i>why</i>, then I'd probably have just accepted them (and probably been less embarrassed about my breasts in general at that age).

Of course not every child is the same, but for that reason I'd just give them to her to wear soon.

Dd is 10 and her breasts have started to bud. She wears the crop tops because her shirts now irritate her breasts, she says it feels like her clothes are chafing her. The crop top alleviates this.

#18 liveworkplay

Posted 06 April 2014 - 07:44 AM

My 8 year old has been going through pre-puberty for a couple of years now. Our GP told me (when I asked how the hell I was meant to tell if there were breast buds) that development starts with a lump under the nipple. She said it is noticeable as she gets lots of mums coming in in a panic because they have found a "lump" After that the nipple puffs up and then slowly the breast tissue develops.

My girls wear crop tops for sport. They complain that the embroidery on their shirts rub their chest. DD1 has a completely flat chest area but it also happens to her. Most of her 10 year old friends wear them for sport, the bigger girls wear them all the time.

Edited by liveworkplay, 06 April 2014 - 07:46 AM.


#19 annodam

Posted 06 April 2014 - 08:02 AM

Wow!!!

DD is 13yo in July & she is flat as!
No crop tops here, just singlets under her uniform.

#20 JustBeige

Posted 06 April 2014 - 08:32 AM

Dd and I found this book to be awesome.  http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/1609580834

It covers a huge range of topics including what stages they go through.

There is an older girl version as well,  http://www.amazon.co...d_bxgy_b_text_y

#21 jopha

Posted 06 April 2014 - 09:25 AM

I was looking at growth charts and came across this, see the last page:

http://www.apeg.org.... 2-18 years.pdf

#22 lucky 2

Posted 06 April 2014 - 10:10 PM

View PostAdamf, on 05 April 2014 - 10:52 PM, said:

As a single father with 2 young daughters how am I supposed to about buying them their first bra
I don't think there is anything wrong with you taking your daughters shopping when the time comes.
It might help them understand that there is nothing secret, frightening or to be ashamed of in their ongoing physical development, that it's an ongoing transition towards adulthood and that a father can support their comfort and wellbeing during this transition.
Take them to the shops, perhaps to Myer or somewhere they do bra fitting, ask for help and let them help.
I don't think it's helpful for it to be seen as only womens business, especially if you are the main or full carer.




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