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Boys will be boys and girls love Barbies


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#1 AmityD

Posted 10 July 2012 - 11:26 AM

My just-turned-two-year-old doesn’t have a Barbie. She has plenty of dolls and soft toys, as well as the trucks, trains, drums and guitars she’s inherited from her big brother. She has a wardrobe full of pretty pink clothes, but most nights she eats her dinner from a Ben 10 plate. She likes to wrestle with her brother, tears around the house on her trike and laughs the loudest when she bashes into someone. No princesses here.

And certainly no gender stereotypes, right? Well, not exactly.

Last week there was a boxed Cinderella Barbie sitting on our kitchen table, ready to be wrapped for a six-year-old girl’s birthday present. When my daughter spotted it her eyes lit up. “That for Poppy?” she asked excitedly.  

“No, not for Poppy,” I replied. The rejection was met with the biggest tantrum I’ve ever seen her stage; she screamed and cried, threw herself on the floor, pounded her fists and wailed in distress. I had to laugh at this powerful display of consumerism and the innate desire for a perfectly presented Barbie. Are girls really that programmed to be attracted to pretty pink things?

The tantrum ran its course and I thought we’d moved on … until I noticed she was too quiet.

I went to investigate and found her digging through my handbag, trying to find my keys so she could use them to jimmy open the Barbie box! Despite this worrying indication of future criminal behaviour I admit I was quietly impressed with her tenacity.

My six-year-old old son came over to see what all the fuss was about and made a vomiting noise. “GROSS, Barbie. Boys HATE Barbies,” he loudly proclaimed.

Hello, gender stereotypes!

It reminded me of the Toronto couple who were in the media last year for choosing to hide the gender of their child, so he or she was free of the assigned gender roles society places on children. Their decision was condemned by social commentators (and the general public) as a drastic over-reaction, and as a potentially harmful act to the child’s sense of identity.

It seemed pretty over the top to me too, seeing as we are much more relaxed with our gender stereotypes these days anyway. We certainly don’t box kids into traditional expectations as much as we used to.

But it’s very interesting to see just how much kids lean towards those traditional roles. I’ve watched my daughter cradle her baby doll in her arms, feeding her a bottle and instinctively rocking her back and forth. My son had a doll too, but he never did that.

In contrast, despite my refusal to buy my son any kind of weapon, he still manages to turn Lego, sticks and anything pointy into a sword or a gun. If he’s around another boy for any period of time there’s guaranteed to be some form of wrestling. Is that behaviour ingrained in them?

But kids don’t always fit the moulds. I remember when we were shopping for my son’s first pair of ‘big boy’ sneakers at about two years of age; after scanning the shelves he selected the pair he wanted – the bright pink sparkly pair.

It seemed like everyone in the store watched me as I reacted to his choice. How committed was I to being free of gender stereotypes?

After a few moments I said he could have them if he wanted them – but then he decided he liked some others more. They were navy, and I admit I was a little relived the decision had been made for me. While I was totally fine with him wearing pink shoes I knew others wouldn’t be, and that I would have to deal with their reactions.

It’s been interesting to see how Shiloh Pitt, Brad and Angelina’s daughter, has chosen to dress ‘like a boy’, and what society’s reaction has been. I think it’s fantastic and hope as society becomes more accepting of individual expression, we won’t have as many kids growing up feeling they have to be something they’re not.

I’m also passionate about encouraging the creative and artistic side of boys, as well as the traditional physical side. Over the years my son and I have been to lots of shows, musicals and art galleries. He learns piano and has done dance classes, we’ve made costumes, played dress-ups and put on concerts.

And in future I’ll take my daughter to soccer, drum lessons and karate if she so desires. In fact, we often joke it will be her and Daddy going to the footy while her brother and I go to see a show.

I don’t want my daughter to feel constrained by the princess tag any more than I want my son to feel he has to play footy instead of singing or dancing. I love that we’re seeing more and more examples of those stereotypes being broken down, with their role models being more varied than ever.

But still, when my kids flick through the pages of the toy catalogue it seems nothing much has changed at all. I won’t be caving on the Barbie yet, but I’m sure I will eventually. And I’ve already thought about getting my daughter a kitchen set for Christmas, proving I’m not as forward thinking as I’d like.

But there is one thing I will never buy her: a toy iron … although as she’s never seen Mummy use one, she probably wouldn’t know what it was anyway!

Do your children fit their gender stereotype? What behaviours do they display that seem ingrained in them? Would you be comfortable letting your child dress like the opposite sex or would you resist it?


#2 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 10 July 2012 - 12:46 PM

In my experience EB is not the place to discuss gender stereotypes!

KIDS are different, why do we need to place gender roles on their choices?

If a girl picks up a doll - oh she's a girly girl, doesn't matter if she's spent the last 4 hours playing with trucks in the mud, it's the nanosecond attention on a doll that everyone highlights!

I get this ALL the time with my ILs. My daughter is as rough as anything, she actually doesn't like dolls at all...nothing to do with me, she walks straight past the doll isle at Kmart and prefers to try and stuff as many rubber lizards in her pockets as possible. BUT, the SECOND she shows even the remotest interest in anything deemed to be 'girly' suddenly it's 'oh she's a girly girl, see none of that gender nonsense you talk about works, girls will be girls'.

The most infuriating for me was when MIL said 'why don't you celebrate the fact that she is a girl'...how precisely? By dressing her in pink and encouraging her to be some vacuous princess? Why is 'being a girl' all about playing with dolls and 'nurturing'?

I want my children to think that they can do, dress, be, ANYTHING they want to be and what is between their legs has NOTHING to do with what they can achieve in life.

Anyway...the actual research is VERY unclear about 'ingrained' gender differences...to the point where many people believe it's complete rubbish. I personally find it odd that people are so obsessed with differences between genders, for me it's the massive differences between PEOPLE that is interesting.

Cordelia Fine wrote a brilliant popular science book on this and it explains the evidence...or extreme lack thereof...for ingrained gender difference, and also the dangers of letting our children believe that their abilities are tied to their genders.

#3 Guest_EBmel_*

Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:08 PM

Some great points there, Livsh.

QUOTE (Livsh @ 10/07/2012, 12:46 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
She actually doesn't like dolls at all...nothing to do with me, she walks straight past the doll isle at Kmart and prefers to try and stuff as many rubber lizards in her pockets as possible.

That made me laugh original.gif

#4 Squeekums The Elf

Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:13 PM

Well my DD didn't get the dolls for girls and trucks for boys memo.

Yesterday at coles walking past the toys all i hear is 'car mum, car mum' its our 'thing' to choose a new car for her collection when we go shopping. Barbies are right next to the cars. Her choice to go cars.
She wrestles with our dog (with supervision) and will happily roll around in the mud if i let her.

I always have people asking why she isnt wearing a pretty dress or saying 'she would be so cute in this' then pointing to a dress.
Dresses seem to annoy her. She attempts to take them off and goes gets pants.

If she wants to play with cars, wrestle around and dress like a 'tomboy' i don't care.


#5 ekbaby

Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:17 PM

I hate the way that whenever my DS is doing something very physical (climbing high things at the park, messy mud or sand play, boisterous running games etc) so many people make a comment like "boys huh?!" "look at them being such boys!" etc. actually a lot of kids like doing those crazy things regardless of their gender, why can't we just say "kids huh?!" or "look at those 3 year olds go!"

#6 BadCat

Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:32 PM

My kids are not gender stereotypical and they dress more like hobos than stereotypical boys or girls.  That would be my fault.  Our house is the land that fashion bypasses with its nose in the air.

They don't play in gender stereotypes either.

We don't do gender here.  We just are.  It's not a conscious thing like the Canadian couple to be non-gendered though.  It's more a case of we don't care whether you're a boy or a girl.  You're just a person and you behave/play/dress the way you feel is right for you.  Most people I say that to don't get it though.  shrug.gif

#7 Emma7

Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:36 PM

This blog proves to be very timely in our household!
Just last week all of the 'big toy sale' catalogues arrived! My 18 mth old son absolutely loved these & spent allot of time very delicately perusing the pages, it was so sweet. When my father in law came over one afternoon my son grabbed one of the catalogues, jumped up alongside him on the couch & said 'book'. They started flicking through together & my son was pointing at various toys on each page whilst my father in law said what they were. When they reached the girls section my son was still pointing when my father in law says 'oh no, we don't look at girls toys' & skipped the whole section. Of course, neither my husband nor I have skipped that section before, we continue to explain what each of the toys are.
I was certainly taken aback by this & although I didn't say anything, it's been playing on my mind. Who cares if he looks at the girls section of a catalogue or plays with girls toys? What on earth will that do?
It definitely proved there still is very much an old school mentality on these things.

#8 SnazzyFeral

Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:39 PM

QUOTE (AmityD @ 10/07/2012, 11:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
It seemed pretty over the top to me too, seeing as we are much more relaxed with our gender stereotypes these days anyway. We certainly don’t box kids into traditional expectations as much as we used to.

[/b]


I learned how to dye things when I was pregnant with my son. I didn't know he was a boy and the only neutral things were lemon yellow which I detest.I would looked forward to finding out if he were a boy or a girl so that I could buy the cool coloured clothes. When he was a few days old we went to target to buy up some of those clothes. They had/have awesome colourful jumpsuits but that is it. Everything else for a boy in august last year had trucks or rockets or trains and was blue (one memorable piece had “Daddy’s car” on it, mummies it appears own nothing not even in the equivalent girls range), girls had cupcakes or ice creams or puppies and were pink. And then there were the gender neutral green jungle animals.  We headed down to k-mart where all the blue things talked about how boys ruled and girl infants were as sexualised as their yummy mummies.  If you didn’t want blue there was gray or brown or karki green but no bright colours for boys and girls were restricted to pink and purples.  There is no need to gender infants, and they never used to rabidly gender babies according to my mum  now they do. It is naive to think that gender stereotypes are not set early and not enforced by society. I dressed my son in neither pink nor blue but every other colour. I even scandalised the day-care when I put him in a yummy as my mummy shirt. the sexualisation there is seemed was to stark to be considered polite but it is ok on girls. They changed him into a shirt declaring how he was grans noisy little monster because boys are nosier than girls aren’t they?

#9 SpaghettiMonster

Posted 10 July 2012 - 01:49 PM

QUOTE
We don't do gender here.  We just are.  It's not a conscious thing like the
Canadian couple to be non-gendered though.  It's more a case of we don't care
whether you're a boy or a girl.  You're just a person and you behave/play/dress
the way you feel is right for you.  Most people I say that to don't get it
though.


I love this. That was so well put that I wish I could pass you a gold trophy through the screen!! Wish more people thought like this as it would free kids up to be more authentic.


Hated seeing an episode of Kate Plus Eight recently where she was shopping for lunchboxes with her sextuplets who were due to start school. When one of the little girls (6 or 7 yrs I think) excitedly grabbed a dinosaur lunchbox, Kate was quick to shoot her choice down, saying, "Um no. You are a girl. NOT a boy!' sad.gif

#10 Jingleflea

Posted 10 July 2012 - 02:02 PM

My 2yr old girl adores dinosaurs and the colour blue.
She takes a stuffed T rex shopping (or everywhere really) with her, feeds her dinner to the plastic dinosaur we have(stuffs peas in it's mouth, lol) and roars like a dinosaur a lot.
I try to avoid the princess girly thing and let her go with what SHE wants, not what society thinks she should like.
If she liked pink, I'd be all for it, but she doesn't so I get her clothes in the boy's section(they get dinosaur t shirts and blue!) and let her like what she likes.
She also likes cars, trucks (and her new fav) cranes.
I WILL be buying a dolls house for her this christmas, but mostly because I'd like one and I think she'd will like it, plus her dinosaurs will fit in it fine original.gif

#11 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 10 July 2012 - 02:29 PM

QUOTE (BadCat @ 10/07/2012, 01:32 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
We don't do gender here.  We just are.  It's not a conscious thing like the Canadian couple to be non-gendered though.  It's more a case of we don't care whether you're a boy or a girl.  You're just a person and you behave/play/dress the way you feel is right for you.  Most people I say that to don't get it though.  shrug.gif



My MIL acts like I'm engaging in some sort of bizarre social experiment that is going to leave my kids permanently damaged...or worse, with a dose of the gays!

I really don't understand how these ideas persist in bloody 2012 for crying out loud!

#12 Milly Molly Mandy

Posted 10 July 2012 - 02:29 PM

Three boys here and they are all stereotypical boys. How much of that has been created by us I don't know. They don't have dolls, never asked. They did however show an instinctual leaning towards balls and trains and trucks.

Poor DS3 with a brother 4 1/2 years older and 6 years older as roll models, it really doesn't matter what DH and I do anyway

#13 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 10 July 2012 - 02:36 PM

QUOTE (EBmel @ 10/07/2012, 01:08 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Some great points there, Livsh.


That made me laugh original.gif



She's a bit of an odd one, that's for sure! Her own private zoo of rubber lizards (or zizzads) gets lined up in her bed every night. The MOUNTAIN of soft toys that the kids have been brought over the past three years sits in the corner gathering dust...with the last doll that MIL brought because 'she needs a doll...' right at the very bottom!

It takes every last ounce of strength in me to grit my teeth and smile when they give DD pink frilly dolls...seriously, as she's opening the present they are staring at me waiting to see what I'm going to say...they then get all coy 'oh I just couldn't resist, I know you don't like them but she's a GIRL'....

Jokes on them though, I love watching THEIR faces when DD takes one look at the doll and tosses it aside to try and wrestle a truck off her brother!


Edited to add - I actually really don't mind dolls...if DD picked up a doll in Kmart and said 'could I please have this lovely doll Mummy' I would buy it for her happily! What I don't agree with is trying to shoehorn your kids into your idea of what they should be!

Edited by Livsh, 10 July 2012 - 02:39 PM.


#14 Penguin78

Posted 10 July 2012 - 02:42 PM

I am a Drama teacher and my husband a musician.

How we had our car loving/ball loving son, we don't know. He was making toothpaste boxes and his leftover bread rolls into cars before he had a toy one.

Now of course, there are cars galore all over our house.

He also loves Teddy's, dressing up, and dancing... and playing Daddy's 'tar!'

So i think there is something innate about loud movement that can attract boys, as I am sure it does attract some girls.

But we try and not make any statements like 'that's not for boys', and will in the future not discourage any preference he may have for girls toys.

#15 MuddyPuddles

Posted 10 July 2012 - 03:45 PM

I was going to do gender neutral everything but turns out I dress DD in pink cos she looks so darn cute in it ( I know damaging her for life!). When she's old enough to show a preference she can wear whatever she wants and I do also dress her in my nephews hand me downs so its not ALL feminine.

We are very conscious when it comes to toys and sippy cups and things like that. We often buy green or yellow and never say "boy" things or "girl" things. I HATE princess stuff so avoid that like the plauge and actively try not to comment on her appearance (eg try to say things like you're so clever/smart instead of so pretty/beautiful).

Anyways, so the first time she ever saw a doll was for her 1st birthday and she attached to it instantly. She loved that thing and dolls are her favourite, she kisses and cuddles them and carrys them everywhere. She generally only plays with her trucks or cars when we actively encourage it.

How much of that is her personality preference and how much is a biological thing I don't know.

She also loves playing kitchen but I put that down to her seeing DH and I cook and figure boys would be the same?



#16 GoldenBlack

Posted 10 July 2012 - 08:15 PM

I always suspect reading these that my parents must have raised an alien.  I despised pink as a child - as an adult I'm attempting not to automatically hate colours, but I am not a pink fan.  I really, REALLY hated Barbies - my Auntie got them for me sometimes because she thought that my parents gifts of pencils and books were uncool.  I decapitated them and turned them into mobiles.

I mean, surely there were other little girls who never allowed anyone to put them in a dress, and never wanted to play with hard plastic dolls?  I honestly never did - my parents used to lament that I was 'impossible' and unladylike.

I find it intensely frustrating when people keep telling me 'Oh, your daughter will be like all little girls, she'll want to be a princess'.  Because it feels like they cannot grasp the fact that once I was a little girl, and I wanted to be an archer, not a princess!  I don't really care what she wants to be, but I don't want people thinking she can only be one thing.

(NB: One day my auntie found the mobile.  No more Barbies for me)

#17 Praetor VitaeChel

Posted 10 July 2012 - 08:37 PM

DS loves pink. He has a kitchen and cooking stuff, which he plays with every day. He loves to cook and have "picnics" where he serves his toys tea and cookies (or gets mummy to sit and drink endless cups of imaginary coffee). He has a baby doll which he feeds bottles, bathes and likes dressing. DH and I can't wait to get him into dance and music classes (DH loves dancing, so no arguments there). BUT He also has trains, trucks and cars and loads of stereotypically "boy" toys. He loves rough and tumble and is one of the most adventurous children. Most people say he is very much a "Boy!".
I also get frustrated by the "Boys will be boys" comments. My brothers were nothing like my DS. Does that make my brothers "girly?"  
Baby2 is apparently a girl, so yes we have bought loads of "girly" clothing. I am quite a "girly-girl" by nature, so while she can't complain I will indulge my girlyness a bit  biggrin.gif . I have never been a fan of pink, so I buy loads of red, blues, yellows and greens. Meanwhile DH has gone crazy on pink  wink.gif . In the end if she wants to play with trucks and get dirty; Wants to play football and is not interested in ballet - that will be ok by me.
In my circle of mummy friends I find that gender is not a big issue. DS loves girls and I hope he will always treat them as equals the way he does now.


#18 MuddyPuddles

Posted 10 July 2012 - 08:45 PM

QUOTE (Goldenblack @ 10/07/2012, 07:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I mean, surely there were other little girls who never allowed anyone to put them in a dress, and never wanted to play with hard plastic dolls?  I honestly never did - my parents used to lament that I was 'impossible' and unladylike.


I was like that until about 12. Total tomboy, following my big brothers everywhere, wearing their hand me downs and not caring. Not interested in dolls or princesses or fairies. Then I started to get slightly more girly every year in highschool and now my fave colour is pink. I have no idea how or why it happened...

#19 Jane Jetson

Posted 10 July 2012 - 09:30 PM

My two daughters are the princessy sort. They're very much into pink, dresses, ballerinas, Disney princesses, Barbie and My Little Pony. This was not exactly my intent when raising them, but I couldn't exactly shut out all outside influence or negate genuine interests they may hold. This is not proof that girls like stereotypically girly pink things. It is just proof that these two specific children have interests which happen to fit the stereotype.

They are also into zombies, football (the younger one), robots (the big one) and dinosaurs. Again, this proves nothing.

I don't think there's anything wrong with girls going for pink stuff per se; the problems arise when we expect all girls to do so and treat girls who are into, say, chemistry sets and kid science books instead, like some sort of freak show (o hai Mum).

Creating a rigid divide is also particularly problematic where boys are concerned. A tomboy is indulged these days, but a boy who wants to wear dresses is still quite likely not to be. Steering boys firmly away from anything remotely feminine just confirms to them that girls' stuff is "lesser" and that they must thus avoid any association with said lesser beings.

Edited to add that Goldenblack, Barbie head mobiles sound awesomely creepy.

Edited by gingembre, 10 July 2012 - 09:34 PM.


#20 Amica

Posted 10 July 2012 - 09:44 PM

I have 3 boys. We don't have any toy trucks or cars that I can recall. Maybe a few Matchbox ones at the bottom of the toy box that never get played with. My boys like Lego, blocks, books and the bowling pin set. We also have a mountain of stuffed toys. My older two bring the pillows and cushions into the living room and lay a toy on each as a bed and play hospitals. That includes my own old cabbage Patch doll who is a regular inpatient!!

I have no idea if those games are typically boy or not. They are quiet, gentle kids. Unless you see him with your own eyes, you wouldn't know my DS2 was even in the room half the time. They get a long with each other like peas in a pod and the tantrum stage came and went without much ado. Whether they fit stereotypes or not I don't know but they are wonderful kids all the same. I don't force them into any particular kind of toy.

#21 kpingitquiet

Posted 10 July 2012 - 09:57 PM

No real leanings in one specific direction, here. She's happiest playing outside in the dirt and thought the animals at the petting park were about the coolest thing ever. Most of the other kids were screaming excitedly and running around, or crying if the animals (llamas, goats, roos, sheep, chickens, etc) got too close. She happily went up to each one, crouched next to it or reached up, as needed, and petted them or scratched (and ate) a bit of dirt with them biggrin.gif So...grubby in a gentle way? Surely there are both boys and girls who behave similarly.

She gets a choice of PJs every night and will almost always choose blue-and-green dinosaurs over pink-and-purple owls. But black-and-multicolored kitty cats wins out over all!

She loves rocking her "bebe" and tucking him into bed. But what makes that girly? Her dad has rocked her every night of her life and is always in charge of bath and bed. She loves her pop-pop "vacuum" too but sees both of us use the big vacuum regularly.

She asks "what's that??" when Barbie or Lalaloopsy ads come on TV, but dragged Buzz Lightyear and Animal (the muppet) toys all over the store when we went to the toy sales. To her, they're all just cool looking toys.

People spend too much time trying to decide what toys and hobbies apparently embody penises and vaginas. Just let your kids be whomever they are. Pink shoes on boys mean exactly jack squat, as do crew cuts on girls. It's just shoes. It's just hair. It's just a doll or a truck. Worry more about raising kind, wise people.

#22 Praetor VitaeChel

Posted 10 July 2012 - 09:57 PM

QUOTE (gingembre @ 10/07/2012, 09:30 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
...a boy who wants to wear dresses is still quite likely not to be. Steering boys firmly away from anything remotely feminine just confirms to them that girls' stuff is "lesser" and that they must thus avoid any association with said lesser beings.


You just reminded me that my current FB profile pic is a pic of my DS and I wearing tiaras playing dress ups the other day. A girlfriend *jokingly* commented that I was in for therapy bills for DS. I replied that DS was the one dressing Me in a tiara and the dog in a "ballerina" dress (Yup that was one unimpressed border collie that day).  biggrin.gif

#23 Let-it-go

Posted 10 July 2012 - 10:03 PM

DD is now 3 and:
Will only wear dresses
Has 4 babies which are fed, bathed, dressed and put to bed with more love and care than my own baby!
Has 3 barbies and takes 1 everywhere
Dresses in fairy dresses constantly, i am that mother with a fairy at the supermarket
Hates boys as I was informed today
Loves pink and will only wear pink
Loves Princess stuff
Loves cooking and ....omg....cleaning

I never encouraged any of it, have attempted to dress her in anything other than pink but she now refuses (she looks so good in blue )

I didnt buy any dolls but she kept going to them at friends houses so i relented and bought one.  

She has blocks, lego, cars, they only get played with when i encourage.

She does get given loads of pink plastic cr@p from inlaws like the Princess stuff which I hate with a passion.  I dont do licsensed stuff.

She is the gender cliche......I have learnt to go with it.  She does love outdoors, sport, balls, playgrounds which I very much encourage.  I have no idea how and why and if did anything to encourage it but i dont think i did, quite the opposite in fact.

Edited by Ehill, 10 July 2012 - 10:12 PM.


#24 Jane Jetson

Posted 10 July 2012 - 10:49 PM

QUOTE (vitaechel @ 10/07/2012, 09:57 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
A girlfriend *jokingly* commented that I was in for therapy bills for DS. I replied that DS was the one dressing Me in a tiara and the dog in a "ballerina" dress (Yup that was one unimpressed border collie that day).  biggrin.gif


Hate to think what she'd say about my DH patiently spinning around being a ballerina with his girls then   laugh.gif

#25 No girls here

Posted 10 July 2012 - 11:07 PM

After growing up in an all girl household and now having an all boy household, I do believe that there are gender differences as a general rule.  Of course there will be exceptions where that doesn't hold true, but I do think that they exist a lot of the time.

My dad didn't want us to miss out on "boy stuff" and let my sisters and me choose matchbox cars every now and again.  But even then we chose the more girly ones: the caravan, horse float, vintage cars etc.  We were big fans of Lego, but on the whole gravitated towards girly stuff.

I have not pushed the whole boy thing with my boys, it was all pretty foreign to me so I would have happily let them, but they and their friends are definitely noisier and more active than the girls I grew up with.  The way they play with their friends is more competitive.  They've never been into cars though, and will happily help out with cooking, they love skipping, and DS2 is thinking of trying out for the dance group at school, but on the whole they are most definitely stereotypical boys.  DS3 is mostly too young to tell at 12 months, but his recent habit of climbing on the coffee table and diving headfirst off it would tend to indicate he is heading in the same direction.




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