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Boys will be boys and girls love Barbies


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#26 BearBait

Posted 10 July 2012 - 11:40 PM

Totally agree Livsh & BadCat. Free their destinies by erasing the gender block. It's all marketing & brainwashing anyway. People in our consumerist society are so conditioned to being led by the nose most can't understand where they are being taken.

#27 IShallWearMidnight

Posted 11 July 2012 - 01:56 AM

I hate this. Today my sister pulled her girls out of the 'boys toys' and back into the 'girls section' so they could spend their birthday money on 'proper toys'
She is also horrified that DD is getting a remote control car for xmas since thats a 'boys toy'

#28 new~mum~reenie

Posted 11 July 2012 - 06:32 AM

I was very gender neutral when DS was born, and still try to be (note curb-side freebie pink trike in siggy), but boy did he gravitate to the 'boys toys'!

Now days he tells me, at the wise age of 3, going on 4, that 'girls can't drive trucks' etc etc because 'they're for boys'.
I'm horrified. I tell him that his grandma has a truck license, that I can drive trucks, harvesters, tractors etc.

Nothing I can do to get him to play with a doll etc. the only time I've seen him push around a toy pram was to rave another boy with another toy pram.

My friend, on the other hand, has a girl the same age. She too was unbiased with her toys, yet she's all princesses and dolls.

They will do what they want. I do agree with that. My efforts were futile. But it doesn't mean a kid that bucks the trend should be treated differently. Let them find their own way original.gif

#29 BadCat

Posted 11 July 2012 - 09:33 AM

QUOTE (Goldenblack @ 10/07/2012, 08:15 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I mean, surely there were other little girls who never allowed anyone to put them in a dress, and never wanted to play with hard plastic dolls?  I honestly never did - my parents used to lament that I was 'impossible' and unladylike.


Oh yes, that was me.  My mother could never figure me out.  She still can't.  That's why she gets on so much better with my girly sister and I get on better with my dad.  He was happy to just let me be and never tried to make me "be" anything.

My DD is the same.  While other girls were putting on makeup, buying new dresses, beggnig for high heels, and getting their hair done professionally for the year 6 farewell, she threw on a pair of black pants, a black top, brushed her hair, slipped on her flat rubber soled shoes and called it good.  And she did look good, just not "girly" good.

#30 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 11 July 2012 - 09:45 AM

QUOTE (new~mum~reenie @ 11/07/2012, 06:32 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
I was very gender neutral when DS was born, and still try to be (note curb-side freebie pink trike in siggy), but boy did he gravitate to the 'boys toys'!

Now days he tells me, at the wise age of 3, going on 4, that 'girls can't drive trucks' etc etc because 'they're for boys'.


YOu know what...boys toys are more fun!! If you really look at them from a toddlers perspective...cars with moving parts that race across the floor...a doll that lies there. I know what I would find more interesting to play with regardless of gender!

The twins have now started preschool and DD told me the other day that she can't play with the boys, she can only be friends with the girls. I think I might have gotten her over it by telling her she can't play with her brother or daddy...but flaming heck that put the willies up me!

#31 Bluenomi

Posted 11 July 2012 - 09:50 AM

DD is a girly girl all of her own choosing. I hate pink so avoid it (well as much as you can when girls clothes only come in pink and purple) but it's her favourite colour. She loves frilly skirts, baby dolls, her dolls house, tea sets, toy food, etc. But it's be her choice.

She's got lego and will sometimes play with it but gets bored and goes back to making cups of tea. She prefers the pink and purple toy cars over the red and blue ones. Any stuffed toy we have 2 types of ends up with one being the mummy and the other being the baby. Never mind the fact Tigger is a boy, in our house it's Mummy Tigger and Baby Tigger.

I'm thinking about getting her a toy kitchen for Christmas because she'd love it and the pinker the better in her eyes. I'd prefer to get her more gender neutral colours but she knows what she likes!

#32 Brownie22

Posted 11 July 2012 - 07:22 PM

QUOTE (BadCat @ 11/07/2012, 09:33 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Oh yes, that was me.  My mother could never figure me out.  She still can't.  That's why she gets on so much better with my girly sister and I get on better with my dad.  He was happy to just let me be and never tried to make me "be" anything.

My DD is not girly at all. No dresses or skirts - jeans and track suits all the way. She hates princesses and gives people filthy looks if they call her one. She is 5 and has been this way since about 3. I admit I struggled because I had in my head what I expected from a girl and part of that was dresses. I used to fight her and try and get her to be what I wanted her to be while her dad just let her be her. I feel bad about it now. I try and let her be her and have even bought her boys clothes cause she likes them better. I admit I wish she would at least sometimes wear what I want her to but life has been a lot easier since I have been more accepting. Now I am actually proud of her individuality.

#33 winterlove

Posted 14 July 2012 - 08:18 PM

Neither of my children fit the gender stereotypes. My DS has always been very nurturing and enjoys imaginative play with dolls and his doll house. I have seen him rock his baby doll to sleep. He equally enjoys playing with vehicles/super hero action figures etc. In relation to the nurturing side, his father has always been very hands on with settling so I think he is mimicking his role model.

  

  My DD on the other hand is rough, loves wrestling and playing with cars/superhero action figures. In fact, she has a mark on her face where she hurt herself wrestling with her boy mates at day care. I wish she had more of her brother’s gentleness!



#34 PooksLikeChristmas

Posted 14 July 2012 - 08:40 PM

Did anyone notice kmart toy catalogue was divided into types of play, instead of along gender lines? I was impressed.

I'm not anti-Barbie. My son has inherited my Barbies, wooden dolls house, Lego, picture books and rocking horse. I would have given him these if he were a girl too. I don't really get what's wrong with a girl liking Barbies or a boy liking swords and dragons or vice versa. I still like both.

The gender stuff does baffle me sometimes. I don't dress him in 'feminine' clothing, but I've had comments about how he was wearing purple or green or red and it make people think he was a girl, then when I correct them they say oh, but his clothes! Like I'm being rude by not dressing him in clothes with trucks or something. Which I do, sometimes. It's a funny old world.

#35 MuddyPuddles

Posted 14 July 2012 - 08:49 PM

QUOTE (Pooks_ @ 14/07/2012, 07:40 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Did anyone notice kmart toy catalogue was divided into types of play, instead of along gender lines? I was impressed.


I didn't notice that but I did notice it was the only place selling a non pink toy kitchen!! I know a few people (including myself) who bought theirs for that reason.

#36 Jingleflea

Posted 14 July 2012 - 08:56 PM

The Big W kitchen was red and white and blue(looked peach in the catalog  though).
My 2yr old DD was called a boy on Friday, because she was wearing a green top, with a bus on it. She LOVES buses so I was stoked to find it in the boy's section of Best and Less.
Then the woman said it was ok for girls to wear blue...but boys can't wear pink. I was thinking"Say...wha'????"
Kids and adults can wear whatever they darn well please. If I had a boy who wanted to wear a pink tutu out I'd let him.

#37 MuddyPuddles

Posted 14 July 2012 - 09:01 PM

QUOTE (Jenflea @ 14/07/2012, 07:56 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
The Big W kitchen was red and white and blue(looked peach in the catalog  though).


Ah, was that plastic? I was only looking at wooden ones and the one I noticed at Big W was a pale pink and grey

Edited: I know which one you mean now, the smaller kitchen. You're right it definitely looks peach in the catalogue and online! I thought it was.)

Edited by JBaby, 14 July 2012 - 09:06 PM.


#38 seayork2002

Posted 14 July 2012 - 09:13 PM

I was never a Tomboy but I was never a girlie girl either, I loved playing with toy cars but I was probably too lazy to a climb a tree (that or I had my head in a book) and the one barbie I did own, I chopped its head off to see how it worked (it was a kissing one)...........My son in more boy than girl (if I had to "categorise" him) but shows both sides to him.

(From going on the article) I am not sure what is wrong with a toy iron (my son does not have one though) for either a boy or girl as I presume when they both grow up they will have to care for themselves at some stage and whether I had a girl (or with my son) any of my children will be taught how to care for themselves and the house.

I did not want to know the sex of my baby and would have brought greens, yellows and neutrals either way, when I was pregnant I could not get myself out of the girl section fast enough all it was was wall to wall pink........toys, clothes, nappies everything............pink all over!!!. I have nothing against the colour but is their no originality in girls clothes? in the supposed boy section (why do they need to categorise toys, especially?) they had greens, reds, yellows etc but in the girls just pink (maybe a purple thrown in...luck?)

Then we get the mothers saying things like "all girls want to princesses" (ah no sorry?) or "I am worried about my girl playing with a boy as they are too rough" "all girls want make up" (no to that too!) but then we have the dad's saying "my son can't play with dolls/have a push chair/tea set as he will be gay"

So maybe if the parents took a look at themselves they may find out that if they just dress their "princesses" in pink form birth they will only where it when they are older perhaps?

Maybe if shops started mixing the toys (one idea) they may get a lot of complains from the "princess" brigade but they be surprised and my sell more?

#39 luey08

Posted 14 July 2012 - 09:18 PM

It is interesting.  looking in the toy catalogues (Toyworld) I have to admit that I was very annoyed to see a dr and nurse set.  The ''lil Dr' set was in a blue box and a boy was on the front of it.  The 'l'il nurse' was in a pink box and had a girl.  Neither profession is now specifically for one gender.  I know wonderful male nurses and female dr's,  haven't we got past this innate stereotype?

I have found that DS does tend to play with trucks, cars, planes.  I have steered him away from the 'pretty shoes' when he was younger.  We did go through a phase of pink being his favourite colour but that is ok.  HE also has a pram and teddy bear.  I have also dug out my old doll bed from when I was a child.  He tucks 'buzz' and 'woody' in there.  I think we should allow children to play with all toys and not set limits

#40 sharkie81

Posted 14 July 2012 - 09:27 PM

My 2yo DS loves Dora the Explorer, his pretend kitchen (LOVES making you a cup of tea and cake) and will change the nappy on his Mickey Mouse about 15 times per day.

But his train set, trucks and sandpit are a close second.

I'm not fazed, we're just letting him play with whatever he fancies.

#41 Liv_DrSperm_sh

Posted 16 July 2012 - 02:34 PM

It's articles like this that make me HATE HATE HATE gender definitions so completely and why I try and avoid 'genderfying' my children.

http://m.smh.com.au/drive/motor-news/town-...0712-21xb1.html


How dare someone make a decision about my abilities based on a cursory observation of my gender...revolting.

The whole pink is for girls, blue is for boys is just the start of the very long and slippery slope into modern sexism!




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