The search for these children's forever home is touching hearts everywhere

Five siblings seeking a forever home have sparked a viral response.
Five siblings seeking a forever home have sparked a viral response. Photo: The Kansas City Star

They might be in need of a family to be part of, but these brothers and sisters are far from alone.  

Five siblings pleading to be adopted together are one step closer to finding a 'forever family' after their appeal sparked an unprecedented response.

When the The Kansas City Star featured the siblings - Bradley, 11, Preston, 10, Layla, 8, Landon, 6, and Olive, 2 - in a "Family Wanted" article last week, adoption agency AdoptKSKids.org, who are managing the children's case, were inundated with calls and emails.

"This is a viral response ... and it's pretty insane," Corey Lada of the Kansas Children's Service League told The Kansas City Star, adding that in 13 years with the organisation, "I've seen nothing like this. Nothing."

The response has been so incredible that the children have now been removed from the AdoptKSKids.org website so staff can sift through all existing inquiries, including 1500 emails.

For confidentiality reasons, details around why the children are in care have not been made public.

Currently, the siblings reside in separate foster care placements - and they're desperate to be reunited.

As well as being adopted together, agency workers hope to identify a family in the local area, so they can remain in Kansas.

According to the feature in The Kansas City Star, the children have a range of interests and very different personalities.

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Bradley loves music - and while he's "a bit shy and quiet" he's also known for being "respectful, sweet and kind". Younger brother, Preston, 10, collects Pokémom and likes fishing and exploring, while eight-year-old Layla enjoys hop-hop dancing and wants to be a vet when she grows up.

Landon, 6, wants to be a P.E. teacher and likes going on outdoor adventures.

Baby of the group, 2-year-old Olive, "is a champion at doing all things that two-year-olds do." When she slows down long enough, however, "she loves to be cuddled and held".

While finding a home for all five siblings is the ideal outcome, it will take a very special family. 

Joni Hiatt, Kansas director of programs for FosterAdopt Connect, a service not affiliated with the siblings' placement, told The Kansas City Star that prospective parents of any one child seeking adoption must be prepared to deal with trauma resulting from the child's past.

"Multiply that by five and that's asking a lot," said Hiatt. "But that bond between siblings is the strongest thing they've got when parents are gone. My hope is that people expressing interest genuinely want to see these children kept together."