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Yetski

Cost of building an architecturally designed home

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Yetski

Hi guys,

I'm thinking about doing a knock down rebuild of my house. I'd like it be double story around 230m2 and architecturally designed high end home. I haven't even spoken to a builder, nor an architect yet but I wanted to know if anyone can give me examples of their build costs. Flat block on the Gold Coast.  I know I need to count in demo costs etc. 

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Leif

We are in Melbourne and recently extended our home. It was designed by an architect who used the rule of $4000/m2 for construction cost but when we went to tender our quotes came back at was almost double that. We ended up doing it owner builder which was much cheaper than the builders quotes. We also probably paid about another 16% of the build cost in other fees/ costs inc the architect. It ended up being much dearer than I thought before we engaged the architect but the house is beautiful so I’m glad we did it 

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Yetski

Thank you so much for sharing those details. Wow, your home must be amazing!! I had a ballpark figure in my mind at 600k-700k, but sounds like I might be dreaming. 

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can'tstayaway

I use a rule of thumb of $1500-5000/m2. Double for 2 storey. My tastes lean towards the upper end of that scale lol

 

Actually, I should update that rule of thumb to be more like $3-10k/m2 with the way costs have increased. 
 

My other suggestion is to work out what your upper budget is, and halve it. Only mention that halved figure and don’t even whisper the actual budget to anyone. You’ll need that as a contingency buffer because things always crop up and it is devastating (emotionally and financially) to run out of money on a build and not be able to finish. Not personal experience but I’ve seen it happen to others. 
 

You can definitely have a nice, architectural house built for $700k but there may be compromises on the way.  There are a lot of pitfalls so I suggest not rushing into signing with anyone. Take your time to read contracts, sit with designs to really think about them and document everything. 

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Yetski
On 02/07/2020 at 8:34 PM, can'tstayaway said:

I use a rule of thumb of $1500-5000/m2. Double for 2 storey. My tastes lean towards the upper end of that scale lol

 

Actually, I should update that rule of thumb to be more like $3-10k/m2 with the way costs have increased. 
 

My other suggestion is to work out what your upper budget is, and halve it. Only mention that halved figure and don’t even whisper the actual budget to anyone. You’ll need that as a contingency buffer because things always crop up and it is devastating (emotionally and financially) to run out of money on a build and not be able to finish. Not personal experience but I’ve seen it happen to others. 
 

You can definitely have a nice, architectural house built for $700k but there may be compromises on the way.  There are a lot of pitfalls so I suggest not rushing into signing with anyone. Take your time to read contracts, sit with designs to really think about them and document everything. 

Thank you so much, great advice! 

 

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YodaTheWrinkledOne

Architectural designed house? I think you are looking at $3000+/m2, depending on who you engage as a builder and how expensive your wants are. If you engage an award winning builder, someone who only builds architect designed homes, then I think you will easily be looking at $4500+/m2. It's not just the cost of the architect, it's also the cost of the builder (IMO, that's where the bulk of you cost will come from).

If you want to reduce costs, then you need to instruct your architect/builder to use standard measurements/fittings where possible, not "bespoke fittings" all over the house.  We have a custom-designed house,  built 3 years ago, and it cost us just under $2000/m2, all expenses included. We put a lot of effort into trying to keep the feel of the design without going nuts with the "bespoke" elements. Our house won't win architectural awards, but everyone who walks in says "Oh, this is lovely" and "It feels beautiful", which it does because it's a well thought out design and well constructed. But it's not super fancy.

On 02/07/2020 at 8:34 PM, can'tstayaway said:

My other suggestion is to work out what your upper budget is, and halve it. Only mention that halved figure and don’t even whisper the actual budget to anyone. You’ll need that as a contingency buffer because things always crop up and it is devastating (emotionally and financially) to run out of money on a build and not be able to finish. Not personal experience but I’ve seen it happen to others. 

Totally agree with this. You need to put the effort in to know what the contract will cover, what costs are likely to blow out. You need to think about every element of a room BEFORE you sign a contract and ask your builder/architect "What does this cover in this room? What could blow out? How much have you allowed for this?" And check to see if they are reasonable allowances. And make sure the foundations of the building are done properly - get a structural engineer to check it if you have crappy soil (particularly clay). If necessary, get a building estimator/quantity surveyor to give you an independent assessment of costs before you start seeking quotes from builders.  Also, speak with previous clients if you can. And if you see a house go up that you like the looks of, drop a note in the letterbox after it's finished asked them who was their builder and what did they think of the process with that builder.

I did a LOT of looking around to see how much we were willing to spend on fixtures, so we had a very good idea of what we would be spending once the build was ready for fit-out.  But a lot of the cost of building was doing stuff that people don't realise or think too much about - foundation, framing, cladding, insulation, doors/windows, electrical layout, etc.

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